Campaign to clear name of Northallerton GP accused of ignoring Iraqi detainee abuse gathers pace

The Northern Echo: CAMPAIGN ONGOING: Derek Keilloh CAMPAIGN ONGOING: Derek Keilloh

SUPPORTERS of a doctor struck off for his involvement in the death of an Iraqi detainee have reignited their campaign to clear his name.

Almost 2,000 people have now signed a petition backing former Northallerton GP Derek Keilloh.

The petition will shortly be handed to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS) which in 2012 removed Mr Keilloh’s name from the Medical Register, ending his career as a doctor.

Supporters are also hoping to use a new draft bill on the regulation of health care professional, due to be debated by Parliament, as an opportunity to voice their criticisms of the MPTS and General Medical Council (GMC), which handled Mr Keilloh’s disciplinary procedure.

A new campaign website highlighting the case will also go live within weeks.

Mr Keilloh was found guilty by the MPTS of misleading and dishonest conduct following the death of Iraqi prisoner Baha Mousa in Basra in 2003.

But supporters say he has been the victim of a miscarriage of justice.

Mother-in-law Judy Nicholls, who has coordinated the campaign to clear his name, said: “The campaign is still continuing and is gathering pace.

“We want the MPTS to review the case because we think it was flawed and prejudiced.

“We believe the judgment against Derek was based on the balance of probability and not beyond reasonable doubt - it was a criminal sanction based on a civil judgment which wasn’t fair in our opinion.”

Mrs Nicholls said that since being struck off her son-in-law and his family had found life hard, but had not given up.

“Derek has now got a new job where he is respected and valued by the people who have employed him which has made him feel a lot better,” she said.

The petition backing Mr Keilloh has already been handed to the Government via Richmond MP William Hague.

Mr Keilloh, 38, was a newly qualified doctor with the Queen's Lancashire Regiment when he tried to save 26-yearold Mr Mousa, who had been beaten by British troops.

The MPTS panel concluded that Mr Keilloh had been more aware of Mr Mousa's injuries than he revealed in his statements to a court martial and public inquiry.

To sign the petition backing Mr Keilloh, visit you.38degrees.org. uk/p/support-derek-keilloh

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:35am Wed 2 Apr 14

Foxhall says...

It is not just the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service that has found Derek Keilloh lacking. The Baha Mousa Inquiry Report is online. How many of those who signed the petition have read what it had to say? It includes:

"Keilloh maintained that apart from a small trace of blood under Baha Mousa’s nose, he had not noticed any of the injuries subsequently found on the body. However, Goulding, Sgt Stephen Saxton and Pte Kevin Armstrong noticed bruising; Cpl Winstanley noticed bruising and swelling, and Baxter noticed Baha Mousa had a puffy face and torn skin on the wrists. Thus, Keilloh was the only medic not to observe injuries to Baha Mousa’s body."

"..neither Keilloh ( and others) made a formal report about what they had seen and none of them reported what they must have known regarding mistreatment of at least some of the Detainees. There was a reluctance to accept that 1 QLR (the regiment) had done anything wrong."

"It is difficult to accept that when attempting to resuscitate Baha Mousa, Keilloh did not see signs of mistreatment to his body. Furthermore, in the light of the evidence from other members of the medical staff that after the death, comments were made in the RAP (Regimental Aid Post) in relation to the injuries to Baha Mousa, I conclude that after this attempt to revive Baha Mousa, Keilloh knew that he had sustained injuries in the TDF. He ought then to have gone to the TDF (Temporary Detention Facility) to check on the condition of the other Detainees. It is also difficult to accept that Keilloh later missed the signs of injuries to (prisoner) D004 and Ahmad Matairi. Even if he did, his response to the complaint of both D004 and Ahmad Matairi was inadequate. He ought to have checked the TDF after the death of Baha Mousa shortly followed by complaints of assault made by two other Detainees. Keilloh’s failure to go to the TDF after Baha Mousa’s death to examine all of the other 190.Detainees was a serious failing. So was his failure to report what I find he must have known to a more senior officer in the Battlegroup."

www.bahamousainquiry
.org/f_report/vol%20
iii/Part%20XVIII/Par
t%20XVIII.pdf
It is not just the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service that has found Derek Keilloh lacking. The Baha Mousa Inquiry Report is online. How many of those who signed the petition have read what it had to say? It includes: "Keilloh maintained that apart from a small trace of blood under Baha Mousa’s nose, he had not noticed any of the injuries subsequently found on the body. However, Goulding, Sgt Stephen Saxton and Pte Kevin Armstrong noticed bruising; Cpl Winstanley noticed bruising and swelling, and Baxter noticed Baha Mousa had a puffy face and torn skin on the wrists. Thus, Keilloh was the only medic not to observe injuries to Baha Mousa’s body." "..neither Keilloh ( and others) made a formal report about what they had seen and none of them reported what they must have known regarding mistreatment of at least some of the Detainees. There was a reluctance to accept that 1 QLR (the regiment) had done anything wrong." "It is difficult to accept that when attempting to resuscitate Baha Mousa, Keilloh did not see signs of mistreatment to his body. Furthermore, in the light of the evidence from other members of the medical staff that after the death, comments were made in the RAP (Regimental Aid Post) in relation to the injuries to Baha Mousa, I conclude that after this attempt to revive Baha Mousa, Keilloh knew that he had sustained injuries in the TDF. He ought then to have gone to the TDF (Temporary Detention Facility) to check on the condition of the other Detainees. It is also difficult to accept that Keilloh later missed the signs of injuries to (prisoner) D004 and Ahmad Matairi. Even if he did, his response to the complaint of both D004 and Ahmad Matairi was inadequate. He ought to have checked the TDF after the death of Baha Mousa shortly followed by complaints of assault made by two other Detainees. Keilloh’s failure to go to the TDF after Baha Mousa’s death to examine all of the other 190.Detainees was a serious failing. So was his failure to report what I find he must have known to a more senior officer in the Battlegroup." www.bahamousainquiry .org/f_report/vol%20 iii/Part%20XVIII/Par t%20XVIII.pdf Foxhall
  • Score: -7

3:48pm Wed 2 Apr 14

NO EINSTEIN says...

It was war you idiot, not a punch up at a football match, the British don't just arrest and detain people in war on a whim, if he was interrogated robustly and subsequently died, it would have been for good reason, lets not blame the Doctor, he is quite an amazing man.

Have you seen how these terrorists act and the things they do to there own people, i've seen rows of people shot for just being suspected of things with NO evidence, gee they shoot young girls in the head for learning to read and write, there like mad dogs, and there is only one way to deal with them.

Stand up for our troops man, or stand in front of them, oh and for defending these people i'd keep your head down for the next few months, it won't make you popular.
It was war you idiot, not a punch up at a football match, the British don't just arrest and detain people in war on a whim, if he was interrogated robustly and subsequently died, it would have been for good reason, lets not blame the Doctor, he is quite an amazing man. Have you seen how these terrorists act and the things they do to there own people, i've seen rows of people shot for just being suspected of things with NO evidence, gee they shoot young girls in the head for learning to read and write, there like mad dogs, and there is only one way to deal with them. Stand up for our troops man, or stand in front of them, oh and for defending these people i'd keep your head down for the next few months, it won't make you popular. NO EINSTEIN
  • Score: 8

6:19pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Foxhall says...

No Einstein clearly has not read the inquiry report. If he had, he would know that the violence against Baha Mousa and other detainees was gratuitous and not part of any intelligent approach to interrogation.

Troops who let their emotions and urge to bully get the better of them endanger fellow troops. Undisciplined mistreatment to the point of of systematic torture and murder helps the other side recruit for further unholy terror.

From the Report of the 2011 Baha Mousa Inquiry:

“My findings raise a significant concern about the loss of discipline and lack of moral courage to report abuse within 1st Battalion the Queen's Lancashire Regiment (1QLR). A large number of soldiers, including senior NCOs, assaulted the Detainees in a facility in the middle of the 1 QLR camp which had no doors, seemingly unconcerned at being caught doing so. Several officers must have been aware of at least some of the abuse. A large number of soldiers, including all those who took part in guard duty, also failed to intervene to stop the abuse or report it up the chain of command.”

Inquiry witnesses described a culture of bullying within 1QLR before the death of Baha Mousa and following it to deter the giving of evidence and punish those who had given a statement.
No Einstein clearly has not read the inquiry report. If he had, he would know that the violence against Baha Mousa and other detainees was gratuitous and not part of any intelligent approach to interrogation. Troops who let their emotions and urge to bully get the better of them endanger fellow troops. Undisciplined mistreatment to the point of of systematic torture and murder helps the other side recruit for further unholy terror. From the Report of the 2011 Baha Mousa Inquiry: “My findings raise a significant concern about the loss of discipline and lack of moral courage to report abuse within 1st Battalion the Queen's Lancashire Regiment (1QLR). A large number of soldiers, including senior NCOs, assaulted the Detainees in a facility in the middle of the 1 QLR camp which had no doors, seemingly unconcerned at being caught doing so. Several officers must have been aware of at least some of the abuse. A large number of soldiers, including all those who took part in guard duty, also failed to intervene to stop the abuse or report it up the chain of command.” Inquiry witnesses described a culture of bullying within 1QLR before the death of Baha Mousa and following it to deter the giving of evidence and punish those who had given a statement. Foxhall
  • Score: -3

5:16pm Fri 4 Apr 14

Kestrel038 says...

One might say that if superior officers were aware of the injuries, then Dr Kellioh was not lacking in his failure to report them.

A doctors job is to heal. Excepting in very rare circumstances, their job is NOT to tackle the causes of injuries, it is NOT to investigate events prior to their involvement with a patient.

If there is an entrenched regime of abuse or torture being carried out within military installations, the responsiblity begins and ends with the commanding officer of said installation.

As Mr Foxhalls excerpts from the inquiry show, Dr Kellioh was not alone in failing to report the alleged torture/abuse. Have these individuals also had their right to practice medicine revoked? Or is it the opinion of the enquiry that one of the youngest and least experienced medics in the unit was solely responsible for confronting commissioned officers on the issue, and betraying his entire unit by going public if that bore no fruit?

Wake up and smell the coffee people.. Most of you wouldn't have the balls to confront your neighbour over playing loud music.. and you have the sheer NERVE to criticise a young man offering his skills and risking his life to heal both friendly and enemy soldiers in the middle of a war zone because he didn't turn on his colleagues and superiors and force an entire regiment to come clean about their activities?? come on.. you're looking at the world through a very strangely tinted pair of spectacles if that is truly what you believe he should have done.
One might say that if superior officers were aware of the injuries, then Dr Kellioh was not lacking in his failure to report them. A doctors job is to heal. Excepting in very rare circumstances, their job is NOT to tackle the causes of injuries, it is NOT to investigate events prior to their involvement with a patient. If there is an entrenched regime of abuse or torture being carried out within military installations, the responsiblity begins and ends with the commanding officer of said installation. As Mr Foxhalls excerpts from the inquiry show, Dr Kellioh was not alone in failing to report the alleged torture/abuse. Have these individuals also had their right to practice medicine revoked? Or is it the opinion of the enquiry that one of the youngest and least experienced medics in the unit was solely responsible for confronting commissioned officers on the issue, and betraying his entire unit by going public if that bore no fruit? Wake up and smell the coffee people.. Most of you wouldn't have the balls to confront your neighbour over playing loud music.. and you have the sheer NERVE to criticise a young man offering his skills and risking his life to heal both friendly and enemy soldiers in the middle of a war zone because he didn't turn on his colleagues and superiors and force an entire regiment to come clean about their activities?? come on.. you're looking at the world through a very strangely tinted pair of spectacles if that is truly what you believe he should have done. Kestrel038
  • Score: 0

11:45pm Fri 4 Apr 14

Foxhall says...

It is nonsense for Kestrel038 to say responsibility for mistreatment begins and ends with the senior officer. "I was only following orders" was not accepted at Nuremberg.

Individuals are responsible for their actions that amount to major abuses of human rights. In any case, no one has suggested that orders for systematic mistreatment of prisoners, including Baha Mousa,were issued.

The fact that other soldiers, including some more senior in age and rank than Captain Keilloh, have got away with poor leadership and / or torture that led to a death due to a conspiracy of silence and intimidation does not excuse the doctor for his failings. Other prisoners were at risk. Having failed to revive Baha Mousa, the seriousness of the threat to others was obvious.

If our sons and daughters have to fight and end up as POWs, we would want them to be treated humanely. The breaking of international treaties re military captives by any state reduces the chances of our troops being dealt with appropriately in future conflicts.

I am well aware that many armed Iraqis did not honour the Geneva Convention. Another generation faced the same issue in WWII. My father provided medical care for Japanese prisoners at Kohima and in Burma when they would let him.
It is nonsense for Kestrel038 to say responsibility for mistreatment begins and ends with the senior officer. "I was only following orders" was not accepted at Nuremberg. Individuals are responsible for their actions that amount to major abuses of human rights. In any case, no one has suggested that orders for systematic mistreatment of prisoners, including Baha Mousa,were issued. The fact that other soldiers, including some more senior in age and rank than Captain Keilloh, have got away with poor leadership and / or torture that led to a death due to a conspiracy of silence and intimidation does not excuse the doctor for his failings. Other prisoners were at risk. Having failed to revive Baha Mousa, the seriousness of the threat to others was obvious. If our sons and daughters have to fight and end up as POWs, we would want them to be treated humanely. The breaking of international treaties re military captives by any state reduces the chances of our troops being dealt with appropriately in future conflicts. I am well aware that many armed Iraqis did not honour the Geneva Convention. Another generation faced the same issue in WWII. My father provided medical care for Japanese prisoners at Kohima and in Burma when they would let him. Foxhall
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree