School Closures: Wednesday, March 26 (NUT National Strike)

SCHOOL CLOSED: Hundreds of schools in the region are affected by Wednesday's strike action

SCHOOL CLOSED: Hundreds of schools in the region are affected by Wednesday's strike action

First published in News
Last updated
The Northern Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Health & Education Editor

HUNDREDS of North-East schools will be closed or partially closed today (Wednesday, March 26) because of the first national strike by the National Union of Teachers for decades.

The last regional teachers’ strikes took place in October when members of the NUT and sister union the NASUWT walked out in North Yorkshire and then in the North-East as part of a continuing dispute over pay, workload and pensions with Education Secretary Michael Gove.

But this time it is the NUT alone which has asked its tens of thousands of members in the North-East and North Yorkshire to walk out.

One of the worst hit areas is County Durham where 58 schools – mainly primary but some secondary – will be closed or partially closed while in Darlington five schools will close and 15 will partially close.

In North Yorkshire the strike will force 24 schools to close for the day and partially close another 46.

Three schools will close in Stockton while in Hartlepool two will close and 12 will partially close.

Mike McDonald, Northern regional secretary of the NUT, said: “It is regrettable that we find ourselves in this position. We have sought to persuade the Secretary of State to come to discuss our concerns for many months and we have been met with procrastination.

“The workload is intolerable and there is a deep concern for the future of our new young teachers. At present, 40 per cent of teachers leave the profession within five years of joining because of the intolerable demands that are made on them.”

Mr McDonald said research indicated that performance related pay will not improve educational standards.

“We deeply regret that the Secretary of State has been allowed to push teachers into this unenviable position and we call on him to enter into meaningful discussions on these issues to help to bring this dispute to an end.”

Striking NUT members from across the region have been invited to attend a rally in the centre of Newcastle today.

A DfE spokesperson said: "Parents will struggle to understand why the NUT is pressing ahead with strikes over the Government's measures to let heads pay good teachers more. They called for talks to avoid industrial action, we agreed to their request, and talks have been taking place weekly.

"Despite this constructive engagement with their concerns, the NUT is taking action that will disrupt parents' lives, hold back children's education and damage the reputation of the profession.”

Information on the impact of industrial action by NUT teachers on Wednesday, March 26 provided on local authority websites.

(NOTE: This does not includes some academies)

County Durham:

Acre Rigg Infant School (2540)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by Teachers

Annfield Plain Infant School (2213)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teachers

Aycliffe Village Primary School (2411)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Benfieldside Primary School (2749)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by NUT members. Classes 3,8 and 9 will remain open all day

Bowburn Infant and Nursery School (2389)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: KS1 classes will be closed due to industrial action.

Brandon Primary School (3525)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by Teachers

Burnhope Primary School (2261)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Teachers Industrial Action

Burnopfield Primary School (2234)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action

Castleside Primary School (2266)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teaching staff

Catchgate Primary School (2210)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Teacher's Strike Action

Consett Junior School (2277)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers.The school will be closed to pupils in classes 1,2 and 4.The school will be open as normal for pupils in class 3,5,6 and 7.

Copeland Road Primary School (2704)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to industrial action by teaching staff. School remains open to Classes 1, 2 and 4

Coxhoe Primary School (2372)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure for classes 9, 7 and 6 due to Industrial action.

Crook Primary School (2308)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Crook Primary School (2308)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Deaf Hill Primary School (2516)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by Teachers

Dene House Primary School (2736)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by Teachers

Esh Winning Primary School (2497)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action - Partial closure. Closed to Year's 3, 4,5 & 6 only.

Etherley Lane Primary School (2401)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: School Closed to Pupils - due to Industrial Action by NUT

Evenwood CofE Primary School (3130)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: The school will partially close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: One KS2 class will be closed due to industrial action.

Howden-le-Wear Primary School (2318)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial School Closure for the day: Y5/6 class and Nursery are open to children as normal. All other classes closed due to Industrial Action by Teachers.

King Street Primary School (2750)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: The school will be closed for Y2, Y5 and Y6 due to Industrial Action being taken by staff. EYFS, Y1, Y3 and Y4 are open as normal

Kirk Merrington Primary School (2361)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Strike Action

Laurel Avenue Primary School (2499)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by NUT members. Nursery, Classes 3 and 4 will remain open all day.

Leadgate Infant & Nursery School (2260)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: The school will be closed for teaching purposes all day due to industrial action by NUT members.

Newker Primary School (2943)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to strike action. Nursery and Class 1B will not open on 26th March. All other classes will open as normal.

Our Lady of the Rosary RCVA Primary School (3510)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Ouston Primary School (2136)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: This is a partial closure due to Industrial action by teachers. The Infant site is closed all day. The Junior Site is open as usual except will be closed for Year 5 pupils

Peases West Primary School (2311)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to industrial action by NUT members. Closed for afternoon Nursery session, Class 1 and Class 2.

Sacriston Nursery and Infant School (2123)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Seaham School of Technology (4019)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Seaview Primary (3520)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (Morning) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teachers. The school is closed for children in Class 5 and Class 6. All other children should attend as normal.

Sedgefield Primary School (2563)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (Afternoon only) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Strike Action - Y1, PM only.

Shield Row Primary School (2730)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers.

Shotton Primary School (2536)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to industrial action by teachers. School open to classes FSU2H, 1B, 2C, 1/2F,3/4C and 6G. Children in class 1FW to attend school in the afternoon.

South Hetton Primary School (2731)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Strike Action

South Pelaw Infant School (2138)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: The school is partially closed due to industrial action by teachers on Wednesday 26th March. Open for Class 3 and Class 5 only. Reopen as usual Thursday 27th March.

South Stanley Infant School (2225)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Teachers' Industrial Strike Action.

St Cuthbert's RCVA Primary School (Chester-le-Street) (3343)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Open for children in Reception Class, Y2 & Y3. Open for Y5 morning only. Closed for Y6, Y4, Y1 all day and Y5 in afternoon. Industrial action by teachers.

St Helen Auckland Primary School (2419)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers - Years 1 to 6 closed, Foundation Stage open as normal.

St Joseph's RCVA Primary School (Blackhall) (3506)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teachers

St Joseph's RCVA Primary School (Blackhall) (3506)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teachers

St Mary Magdelen RCVA Primary School (3301)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Strike Action

St Mary's RCVA Primary School (Barnard Castle) (3461)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

St Mary's RCVA Primary School (Consett) (3401)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial Closure due to Industrial Strike Action - Year R and Year 1 classes only will be closed to pupils.

St Mary's RCVA Primary School (Southmoor) (3384)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Due to Strike action Partial closure of school Classes 1,2 and 3 will be closed. CLASSES 4 AND 5 WILL BE OPEN AS USUAL.

St Mary's RCVA Primary School Wingate (3505)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action by teachers

St Patrick's RCVA Primary School (Consett) (3404)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: The school is only partially closed - Y1HF, Y1CS, Y2KB, Y4EW, Y4MW and Y5JD classes are in as normal, the rest of the school is closed due to Industrial Action.

Sunnybrow Primary School (2316)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: strike action by teaching staff

Tanfield School College of Science and Engineering (4099)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by members of the National Union of Teachers

The Meadows (7000)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: PARTIAL CLOSURE DUE TO INDUSTRIAL ACTION THE SCHOOL WILL REMAIN OPEN TO Y10 AND THE LEAP PROVISION

The Oaks Secondary School (7033)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by NUT members

Tow Law Millennium Primary School (2307)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers

Westlea Primary School (2043)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial Action

Whitworth Park School (4154)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action in the form of strike by NUT. School will close to Year 7, 8 and 9. It will be open to Year 10, 11 and Sixth Form. Year 10, 11 and Sixth Form should attend as normal.

Wingate Infants' School (2531)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Industrial action by teachers.

Witton Gilbert Primary School (2462)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to Industrial action by teachers. School will be closed to children in Year 1 and Year 4 ONLY. Children in all other classes should attend as normal.

Wolsingham Primary School (2329)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: Partial closure due to industrial action by NUT members. The school will be closed all day to pupils in Nursery and classes 1, 2, 4 and 6. The school will be open all day to Classes 3, 5, 7 and 8.

Woodhouse Community Primary School (3523)
The school will close on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 (All day) and re-open on Thursday, 27 March 2014 (Morning). Reason for closure: due to strike action, partial closure of the school: EYFS & Class 5 will be closed. CLASSES 1, 2, 3, 4 & 6 WILL BE OPEN AS USUAL.

Darlington Borough Council:

NurseriesBorough Road Nursery - Open

George Dent Nursery - Closed

Primary Schools

Federation of Abbey Schools  - Partially open

Federation of Bishopton, Redmarshall and Heighington CE Primary Schools: Bishopton and Redmarshall open, Heighington partially open

Cockerton CE Primary School  - Partially open

Corporation Road Community Primary School  - Partially open

Firthmoor Primary School  - Open

Gurney Pease Academy - No reports

Harrowgate Hill Primary School - Partially open

Heathfield Primary School  - Partially open

High Coniscliffe CE Primary School  - Partially open

Holy Family RC Primary School  - Open

Hurworth Primary School  - Closed

Mount Pleasant Primary School  - Partially open

Federation of Mowden Schools  - Partially open

Northwood Primary School  - Partially open

Red Hall Primary School  - Partially open (reception and year 6 affected) 

Reid Street Primary School  - Partially open

Rydal Academy  - Open

Skerne Park Primary School - No reports 

Springfield Academy  - Open

St Augustine's RC Primary School - Open  

St Bede's RC Primary School - Open 

St John's CE Primary School  - Open

St Teresa's RC Primary School  - Partially open

West Park Academy  - Open

Whinfield Primary School  - Open

Secondary Schools and Colleges

Carmel College (a Catholic Academy)  - Open

Darlington School of Mathematics and Science  - Open 

Haughton Academy  - Open 

Hummersknott Academy  - Open

Hurworth School  - Open

Longfield Academy of Sport  - Open 

Other Schools and Colleges

Beaumont Hill Academy  - Primary open, Secondary closed 

Rise Carr College - Open

North Yorkshire:

Ainderby Steeple Church of England Primary School Partially Open

Aireville School Partially Open

Amotherby Community Primary School Partially Open

Applegarth Primary School Partially Open

Barkston Ash Catholic Primary School Partially Open

Barlby High School Partially Open

Carlton and Faceby Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School Partially Open

Castleton Community Primary School Partially Open

Catterick Garrison, Carnagill Community Primary School Partially Open

Catterick Garrison, Le Cateau Community Primary School Partially Open

Cononley Community Primary School Partially Open

Filey School Partially Open

Gladstone Road Junior School Partially Open

Hawes Community Primary School Partially Open

High Bentham Community Primary School Partially Open

Hunmanby Primary School Partially Open

Hutton Rudby Primary School Partially Open

Ingleton Primary School Partially Open

King James's School Partially Open

Kirk Fenton Parochial Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Partially Open

Lindhead School Partially Open

Malton School Partially Open

Oatlands Community Junior School Partially Open

Pickering Community Infant School Partially Open

Richmond School Partially Open

Rossett Acre Primary School Partially Open

Saltergate Community Junior School Partially Open

Scarborough, Northstead Community Primary School Partially Open

Selby, Longman's Hill Community Primary School Partially Open

Settle College Partially Open

Sherburn High School Partially Open

Skipton Parish Church Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Partially Open

Sowerby Community Primary School Partially Open

Springwater School Partially Open

St Francis Xavier School Partially Open

St George's Roman Catholic Primary School Partially Open

St Hedda's Roman Catholic Primary School Partially Open

St Nicholas Church of England Primary School, West Tanfield Partially Open

St Peter's Roman Catholic Primary School Partially Open

Starbeck Community Primary School Partially Open

Stillington Primary School Partially Open

Stokesley Community Primary School Partially Open

Stokesley School Partially Open

Tadcaster, Riverside Community Primary School Partially Open

Thirsk Community Primary School Partially Open

Wistow Parochial Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Partially Open

Allertonshire School Closed

Appleton Roebuck Primary School Closed

Filey Church of England Voluntary Controlled Nursery and Infant School Closed

Filey Junior School Closed

Fylingdales Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Closed

Gladstone Road Infant School Closed

Glaisdale Primary School Closed

Ingleby Greenhow Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Closed

Lythe Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Closed

Melsonby Methodist Primary School Closed

Mill Hill Community Primary School Closed

Monk Fryston Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Closed

Norton Community Primary School Closed

Scalby School Closed

Scarborough, Overdale Community Primary School Closed

Selby High School Specialist School for the Arts and Science Closed

Sinnington Primary School Closed

Snainton Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School Closed

St Mary's Roman Catholic Primary School, Malton Closed

Sutton-in-Craven Community Primary School Closed

Terrington Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School Closed

Thorpe Willoughby Community Primary School Closed

Upper Wharfedale School Closed

Whitby, Airy Hill Community Primary School Closed

Stockton Borough Council:

Billingham South Primary School

Thornaby CE Primary School

Village Primary School, Thornaby

Asht Trees School, Billingham

Middlesbrough Borough Council:

Parents are advised to check individual school websites

Hartlepool School Closures:

Greatham C of E Primary School

Kingsley Primary School

Redcar and Cleveland:

Parents are advised to check individual school websites

Comments (64)

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6:06pm Tue 25 Mar 14

durhamchap says...

So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?
So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ? durhamchap
  • Score: 5

7:14pm Tue 25 Mar 14

miketually says...

durhamchap wrote:
So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?
The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines.

Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking.
[quote][p][bold]durhamchap[/bold] wrote: So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?[/p][/quote]The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines. Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking. miketually
  • Score: 13

7:19pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Time-Traveller says...

GOOD! They should be fined more.... striking won't get them anything except into my dog house...
GOOD! They should be fined more.... striking won't get them anything except into my dog house... Time-Traveller
  • Score: -5

7:25pm Tue 25 Mar 14

spragger says...

Most teachers profess that the pupils come first ..
You may wish to remind them of that, when they take another strike day, driven by personal greed ..
Most teachers profess that the pupils come first .. You may wish to remind them of that, when they take another strike day, driven by personal greed .. spragger
  • Score: 1

7:29pm Tue 25 Mar 14

laboursfoe says...

miketually wrote:
durhamchap wrote:
So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?
The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines.

Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking.
They aren't fined for striking they are taking an unpaid day off and a few of them will perhaps operate a picket.

Many parents are indeed unclear about why NUT are calling the strike. I presume it is because they are unhappy that some ciolleges will be paid more.
[quote][p][bold]miketually[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]durhamchap[/bold] wrote: So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?[/p][/quote]The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines. Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking.[/p][/quote]They aren't fined for striking they are taking an unpaid day off and a few of them will perhaps operate a picket. Many parents are indeed unclear about why NUT are calling the strike. I presume it is because they are unhappy that some ciolleges will be paid more. laboursfoe
  • Score: 0

9:09pm Tue 25 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

****NUT their sheer arrogance and pure idleness knows 'NO bounds', again decent working class **Working Families *clobbered by pathetic strikes. Subtract their long, 'long School Holidays', so called training days' (nearly always **pegged on to a long weekends, the number of times, also 'add on' the Teachers who say they cannot get to school because of' winter weather' and so called 'Heating-Breakdowns'
, yet Fire, Police, ambulance and a massive host of 'other professions and WORKERS' can all get regularly to work in bitter winter conditions and their 'ever diminishing number of face to face' hours their ****actually teach, is a joke and beggars belief, now in Britain. They reckon, minus all breaks etc, etc, the average actual TEACHING day is down to about FOUR Hours (If that). No wonder children cannot read, write and do arithmetic.. I smell Trade Union 'Reds under the Teaching Bed now'.......A pathetic disgrace and an affront to 'decent hardworking families' who have to fork out yet more money and 'take forced and unnecessary time off work 'because of politically motivated pathetic unreasonable strikes. Sack all these Strikers' and 're-employ people' who WANT to work, in fact my great-grandfather (with his army service, in bitter winter conditions may I add) and grandfather (self-taught) could do a better job of teaching and they have never seen a so called 'Teaching Training College' in their lives...
****NUT their sheer arrogance and pure idleness knows 'NO bounds', again decent working class **Working Families *clobbered by pathetic strikes. Subtract their long, 'long School Holidays', so called training days' (nearly always **pegged on to a long weekends, the number of times, also 'add on' the Teachers who say they cannot get to school because of' winter weather' and so called 'Heating-Breakdowns' , yet Fire, Police, ambulance and a massive host of 'other professions and WORKERS' can all get regularly to work in bitter winter conditions and their 'ever diminishing number of face to face' hours their ****actually teach, is a joke and beggars belief, now in Britain. They reckon, minus all breaks etc, etc, the average actual TEACHING day is down to about FOUR Hours (If that). No wonder children cannot read, write and do arithmetic.. I smell Trade Union 'Reds under the Teaching Bed now'.......A pathetic disgrace and an affront to 'decent hardworking families' who have to fork out yet more money and 'take forced and unnecessary time off work 'because of politically motivated pathetic unreasonable strikes. Sack all these Strikers' and 're-employ people' who WANT to work, in fact my great-grandfather (with his army service, in bitter winter conditions may I add) and grandfather (self-taught) could do a better job of teaching and they have never seen a so called 'Teaching Training College' in their lives... cushybutterfield
  • Score: -9

9:43pm Tue 25 Mar 14

loan_star says...

Since the teachers claim that they don't get these long holidays people think they get then why can't they go on strike when the kids are off and just refuse to do all this extra work they say they do on that particular day?
Since the teachers claim that they don't get these long holidays people think they get then why can't they go on strike when the kids are off and just refuse to do all this extra work they say they do on that particular day? loan_star
  • Score: 10

10:58pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Davy Crocket says...

Let the 1% get fat and richer ... Let the lazy skive on full benefits ... Decent honest hard workers are being squeezed like never before ... The country is broke and bust so striking is ineffective ... The cashpot is empty unless youre the 1% or on full benefits then you're a lapping cat licking the cream off your lips.
Let the 1% get fat and richer ... Let the lazy skive on full benefits ... Decent honest hard workers are being squeezed like never before ... The country is broke and bust so striking is ineffective ... The cashpot is empty unless youre the 1% or on full benefits then you're a lapping cat licking the cream off your lips. Davy Crocket
  • Score: -6

11:08pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Benitocrewe says...

Does anybody know the reason why the teachers are striking?
Does anybody know the reason why the teachers are striking? Benitocrewe
  • Score: 6

6:54am Wed 26 Mar 14

conlinjohn@ymail.com says...

miketually wrote:
durhamchap wrote:
So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?
The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines.

Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking.
losing a days pay by choice my friend
[quote][p][bold]miketually[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]durhamchap[/bold] wrote: So if a child misses school for a holiday in term time the parents are fined.Well if the teachers are not working should parents not be able to fine them in return ?[/p][/quote]The fine on holidays is levied by the government, not by teachers. Most teachers (75%, I think) do not support the fines. Teachers are 'fined' a days pay for striking.[/p][/quote]losing a days pay by choice my friend conlinjohn@ymail.com
  • Score: 0

7:24am Wed 26 Mar 14

plain-man says...

quote "losing a days pay by choice my friend"

must be getting paid to much give them a pay cut then they can`t afford to strike
quote "losing a days pay by choice my friend" must be getting paid to much give them a pay cut then they can`t afford to strike plain-man
  • Score: -4

8:17am Wed 26 Mar 14

thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth says...

Teachers have always been a militant bunch. I remember the strikes in the 80s which had a massive effect on school kids and their education. Little has changed - this lot will strike at the drop of a hat and couldn't care less about their pupils.

With 3 months a year off they have no right what so ever to strike. They are typical lazy public sector workers who think the world owes them a living and who won't think twice about holding the country to ransom for their own personal greed.
Teachers have always been a militant bunch. I remember the strikes in the 80s which had a massive effect on school kids and their education. Little has changed - this lot will strike at the drop of a hat and couldn't care less about their pupils. With 3 months a year off they have no right what so ever to strike. They are typical lazy public sector workers who think the world owes them a living and who won't think twice about holding the country to ransom for their own personal greed. thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth
  • Score: -2

8:58am Wed 26 Mar 14

David Lacey says...

Meanwhile the UK slips further behind the rest of the world in terms of educational standards. All due to lousy teaching and militant unions, ably assisted by local authorities. The public sector needs a gigantic enema up its ars*.
Meanwhile the UK slips further behind the rest of the world in terms of educational standards. All due to lousy teaching and militant unions, ably assisted by local authorities. The public sector needs a gigantic enema up its ars*. David Lacey
  • Score: -1

9:58am Wed 26 Mar 14

Auldgadgey says...

Just to remind you, the country's problems were caused by the bankers not by teachers or any other public servants.
This government fights to keep the bankers "bonuses" yet cuts the pay of public servants.
Strong unions are a benefit to the country by keeping inequality to a minimum, since Maggie weakened them this country has gone from bad to worse.
The top five families now own wealth equivalent to that of the bottom 18% of the population.
Just to remind you, the country's problems were caused by the bankers not by teachers or any other public servants. This government fights to keep the bankers "bonuses" yet cuts the pay of public servants. Strong unions are a benefit to the country by keeping inequality to a minimum, since Maggie weakened them this country has gone from bad to worse. The top five families now own wealth equivalent to that of the bottom 18% of the population. Auldgadgey
  • Score: 5

9:59am Wed 26 Mar 14

miketually says...

I knew I'd see some reasonable, rational discussion of this issue on here. Thank you for not disappointing me :)
I knew I'd see some reasonable, rational discussion of this issue on here. Thank you for not disappointing me :) miketually
  • Score: 4

10:35am Wed 26 Mar 14

David Lacey says...

WHAT!! I hope you are not referring to the garbage posted by "Auldgadgey". It bears no relationship to the truth. Those of us who lived through the period 1950 to 1985 know all we need to know about modern trades unions. They are a distorted version of the magnificent campaigners who fought for justice before WW2. Led by millionaires like Bob Crow, Christine Blower and Red Len they exploit the workers and the long suffering UK public equally.
.
When it comes to fairness remember that the top 1% of wage earners pay 30% of all income tax. And left wingers would have them pay more. Now who is greedy?
WHAT!! I hope you are not referring to the garbage posted by "Auldgadgey". It bears no relationship to the truth. Those of us who lived through the period 1950 to 1985 know all we need to know about modern trades unions. They are a distorted version of the magnificent campaigners who fought for justice before WW2. Led by millionaires like Bob Crow, Christine Blower and Red Len they exploit the workers and the long suffering UK public equally. . When it comes to fairness remember that the top 1% of wage earners pay 30% of all income tax. And left wingers would have them pay more. Now who is greedy? David Lacey
  • Score: -8

12:23pm Wed 26 Mar 14

The Grim North says...

David Lacey wrote:
WHAT!! I hope you are not referring to the garbage posted by "Auldgadgey". It bears no relationship to the truth. Those of us who lived through the period 1950 to 1985 know all we need to know about modern trades unions. They are a distorted version of the magnificent campaigners who fought for justice before WW2. Led by millionaires like Bob Crow, Christine Blower and Red Len they exploit the workers and the long suffering UK public equally. . When it comes to fairness remember that the top 1% of wage earners pay 30% of all income tax. And left wingers would have them pay more. Now who is greedy?
I assume the people who winge about the highest earners and want their pay capped will be happy to pay more tax themselves to make up for the shortfall in overall income tax take.
[quote][p][bold]David Lacey[/bold] wrote: WHAT!! I hope you are not referring to the garbage posted by "Auldgadgey". It bears no relationship to the truth. Those of us who lived through the period 1950 to 1985 know all we need to know about modern trades unions. They are a distorted version of the magnificent campaigners who fought for justice before WW2. Led by millionaires like Bob Crow, Christine Blower and Red Len they exploit the workers and the long suffering UK public equally. . When it comes to fairness remember that the top 1% of wage earners pay 30% of all income tax. And left wingers would have them pay more. Now who is greedy?[/p][/quote]I assume the people who winge about the highest earners and want their pay capped will be happy to pay more tax themselves to make up for the shortfall in overall income tax take. The Grim North
  • Score: 7

2:22pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

So a 'Government Education Minister' chooses not to turn up at a 'Union Meeting and 'Shirker Unite United' all go on Strike, 'clobbering and shafting' decent working class families ** again, ***again, **again and ***again, not wonder the standard of Teaching now in Britain 'stinks to high heaven' the poor kids are hardly at school, so don't blame BANKERS its WELL PAID 'HOLIDAY, TRAINING DAY SHOD, TEACHERS STRIKING AGAIN,. if they kids reach an open school it now looks like an average of ****maximum teaching at no more than FOUR HOURS a day.................
...The Marxist 'Reds under the bed' are at it again, stirring, conniving, agitating.......all to score political points. The Kids....Who cares a Monkeys?
So a 'Government Education Minister' chooses not to turn up at a 'Union Meeting and 'Shirker Unite United' all go on Strike, 'clobbering and shafting' decent working class families ** again, ***again, **again and ***again, not wonder the standard of Teaching now in Britain 'stinks to high heaven' the poor kids are hardly at school, so don't blame BANKERS its WELL PAID 'HOLIDAY, TRAINING DAY SHOD, TEACHERS STRIKING AGAIN,. if they kids reach an open school it now looks like an average of ****maximum teaching at no more than FOUR HOURS a day................. ...The Marxist 'Reds under the bed' are at it again, stirring, conniving, agitating.......all to score political points. The Kids....Who cares a Monkeys? cushybutterfield
  • Score: -4

5:36pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Longbowman666 says...

thetruthyoucanthandl
ethetruth
wrote:
Teachers have always been a militant bunch. I remember the strikes in the 80s which had a massive effect on school kids and their education. Little has changed - this lot will strike at the drop of a hat and couldn't care less about their pupils.

With 3 months a year off they have no right what so ever to strike. They are typical lazy public sector workers who think the world owes them a living and who won't think twice about holding the country to ransom for their own personal greed.
Seriously, can anyone ever recall a time when teachers weren't either threatening strikes or complaining about their workload / pensions / pay / everything else, or when they ever said that any education minister of any political persuasion was any good?

I hate to say it, teachers, but I can't ever recall a time you weren't!

Good to see so little has changed with the NUT from the 70's until now...
[quote][p][bold]thetruthyoucanthandl ethetruth[/bold] wrote: Teachers have always been a militant bunch. I remember the strikes in the 80s which had a massive effect on school kids and their education. Little has changed - this lot will strike at the drop of a hat and couldn't care less about their pupils. With 3 months a year off they have no right what so ever to strike. They are typical lazy public sector workers who think the world owes them a living and who won't think twice about holding the country to ransom for their own personal greed.[/p][/quote]Seriously, can anyone ever recall a time when teachers weren't either threatening strikes or complaining about their workload / pensions / pay / everything else, or when they ever said that any education minister of any political persuasion was any good? I hate to say it, teachers, but I can't ever recall a time you weren't! Good to see so little has changed with the NUT from the 70's until now... Longbowman666
  • Score: -2

6:31pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Red rose lad says...

Part of their beef is with performance related pay. The ones who aren't up to it are about to get found out and are running scared. I take my hat off to those brilliant teachers who inspire our young uns and make them want to learn. The good ones deserve our respect and had we the money I would pay them much more for their efforts. This measure will help to reward the good ones but will also identify those wasters who were just too scared to leave school.
Part of their beef is with performance related pay. The ones who aren't up to it are about to get found out and are running scared. I take my hat off to those brilliant teachers who inspire our young uns and make them want to learn. The good ones deserve our respect and had we the money I would pay them much more for their efforts. This measure will help to reward the good ones but will also identify those wasters who were just too scared to leave school. Red rose lad
  • Score: 0

6:48pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kate-m says...

I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches. kate-m
  • Score: 13

6:54pm Wed 26 Mar 14

mrpouch says...

Teacher are not well to start off, have to work for years to reach a decent salary. Gove wants to introduce performance related pay where pay is at the whim of management.
He also want us to pay more pension contribution, to get less out and retire at 68. The teacher pension is self financing and any shortfall is due to the government taking money out the pot
Yes teacher do get on average 25 day more holiday a year but with 50% of new teacher leaving the profession within 5 year what does this tell you.
Teacher are not well to start off, have to work for years to reach a decent salary. Gove wants to introduce performance related pay where pay is at the whim of management. He also want us to pay more pension contribution, to get less out and retire at 68. The teacher pension is self financing and any shortfall is due to the government taking money out the pot Yes teacher do get on average 25 day more holiday a year but with 50% of new teacher leaving the profession within 5 year what does this tell you. mrpouch
  • Score: 6

7:36pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Benitocrewe says...

If you don't know the reasons behind the teachers striking then I don't really think that you should be commenting on here. It's clear, judging by some of the mindless ramblings that I've just read, that some people have entered a discussion on a topic that they know absolutely nothing about.
I suggest that you read through some of Michael Gove's policies and his plans for the future before you comment further.
If you don't know the reasons behind the teachers striking then I don't really think that you should be commenting on here. It's clear, judging by some of the mindless ramblings that I've just read, that some people have entered a discussion on a topic that they know absolutely nothing about. I suggest that you read through some of Michael Gove's policies and his plans for the future before you comment further. Benitocrewe
  • Score: 10

8:20pm Wed 26 Mar 14

thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth says...

kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I'd love to see you do my job!

You wouldn't last 5 minutes.

And I love what I do.
[quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I'd love to see you do my job! You wouldn't last 5 minutes. And I love what I do. thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth
  • Score: -3

8:25pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Longbowman666 says...

kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not.

That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do.

So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own.
[quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not. That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do. So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own. Longbowman666
  • Score: 0

10:34pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kate-m says...

thetruthyoucanthandl
ethetruth
wrote:
kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I'd love to see you do my job!

You wouldn't last 5 minutes.

And I love what I do.
Brilliant! Then that's that then, you couldn't handle my job and I couldn't handle yours! So glad we got that one sorted!
[quote][p][bold]thetruthyoucanthandl ethetruth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I'd love to see you do my job! You wouldn't last 5 minutes. And I love what I do.[/p][/quote]Brilliant! Then that's that then, you couldn't handle my job and I couldn't handle yours! So glad we got that one sorted! kate-m
  • Score: 1

10:39pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kate-m says...

Longbowman666 wrote:
kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not.

That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do.

So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own.
I was responding to some of the quotes above actually.

And good, so you may well know then that if you are in a demanding job, being massively overworked and underpaid and one day you got a chance to speak up about it, then that's what you'd do, no?
[quote][p][bold]Longbowman666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not. That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do. So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own.[/p][/quote]I was responding to some of the quotes above actually. And good, so you may well know then that if you are in a demanding job, being massively overworked and underpaid and one day you got a chance to speak up about it, then that's what you'd do, no? kate-m
  • Score: 2

11:14pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Longbowman666 says...

kate-m wrote:
Longbowman666 wrote:
kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not.

That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do.

So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own.
I was responding to some of the quotes above actually.

And good, so you may well know then that if you are in a demanding job, being massively overworked and underpaid and one day you got a chance to speak up about it, then that's what you'd do, no?
Perhaps, but I would also temper it with a dose of realism, as we all have to. The world is never what we want and we have to work with that. Yes, we'd all like a lot of money for what we do, we'd all like to be appreciated more and have much less stress, bit the simple fact of the world is that it isn't going to happen anytime soon. Protected pensions are a thing of the past, the working age is going up as life expectancy increases, and it seems that we all have to do more with less.

Speaking up is one thing, but needing to match your expectations and wishes against what is practically achievable is quite another, and I think that the NUT, should it continue down this road, will risk losing the small thread of sympathy from the parents, most of whom have also had to make sacrifices, see pensions change and do more for less.
[quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Longbowman666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I for one would never say that it was an 'easy ride' to be a teacher, or that you were 'lazy' - I know full well that your profession as a whole is not. That said, however, if you take the money you also take the demands and stresses of the job - likewise many other people work in professions that demand similar hours and have stress levels which are equal to or even surpass your own, and they also have to cope with the competing demands of career and family, just as you do. So, in that sense, teachers are no different than many others who have responsibilities, and, yes, that does include myself as well as I have a similar work pattern to your own.[/p][/quote]I was responding to some of the quotes above actually. And good, so you may well know then that if you are in a demanding job, being massively overworked and underpaid and one day you got a chance to speak up about it, then that's what you'd do, no?[/p][/quote]Perhaps, but I would also temper it with a dose of realism, as we all have to. The world is never what we want and we have to work with that. Yes, we'd all like a lot of money for what we do, we'd all like to be appreciated more and have much less stress, bit the simple fact of the world is that it isn't going to happen anytime soon. Protected pensions are a thing of the past, the working age is going up as life expectancy increases, and it seems that we all have to do more with less. Speaking up is one thing, but needing to match your expectations and wishes against what is practically achievable is quite another, and I think that the NUT, should it continue down this road, will risk losing the small thread of sympathy from the parents, most of whom have also had to make sacrifices, see pensions change and do more for less. Longbowman666
  • Score: -3

12:27am Thu 27 Mar 14

pearsonasnic says...

I don't think some people realise how hard teachers work.

I did a work placement in a primary school and I often heard teachers talking about how they had gone home and worked straight when they got home and had very little time for their family and then basically fallen asleep at their computers late. It was common to hear about skipped meals as well.

Those so called long holidays they get, do you really think they sit around doing nothing, they still have to work most of the days. Lesson plans, marking work the list goes on. If teachers really did sit around doing nothing during there time off schools would be a mess, then there would be something to complain about!

I have a huge respect for most teachers especially after spending time in a school, they work hard, rarely get a thank you but still love working with our children and seeing them achieve.
I don't think some people realise how hard teachers work. I did a work placement in a primary school and I often heard teachers talking about how they had gone home and worked straight when they got home and had very little time for their family and then basically fallen asleep at their computers late. It was common to hear about skipped meals as well. Those so called long holidays they get, do you really think they sit around doing nothing, they still have to work most of the days. Lesson plans, marking work the list goes on. If teachers really did sit around doing nothing during there time off schools would be a mess, then there would be something to complain about! I have a huge respect for most teachers especially after spending time in a school, they work hard, rarely get a thank you but still love working with our children and seeing them achieve. pearsonasnic
  • Score: 7

12:45pm Thu 27 Mar 14

ianh says...

Most people on hear ranting about teachers having an easy life have no understanding of what the job entails today.
A few years ago my perception was the same, fed by the media, all i could see were the long holidays and short days.

I subsequently became a school governor and quickly saw just how hard the school leadership teams have to work in delivering a top education in spite of everchanging rules and regulations.
I then saw my daughter go through University and Teacher Training and the reality truly struck home.
She now works at a local primary school. She leaves home at 7.30 every morning, gets home at 5.30-6pm, then does another 2 hrs minimum planning and marking.
Most Sundays she works another 3-4 hrs planning for the following week and approx 25-35% of her holidays are spent working.

These people are vital to the very future of our country and we need to ensure that we protect their position in society and retain the best of their profession in the state schools.
The school heads are no longer headMASTERS, they are CEOs of companies with budgets running into the millions.
One thing education does need is some stability, as every education secretary comes in wishing to reinvent the wheel every 3 yrs meaning that no programme ever really gets established. In that respect Gove is one of the most culpable ever.
Most people on hear ranting about teachers having an easy life have no understanding of what the job entails today. A few years ago my perception was the same, fed by the media, all i could see were the long holidays and short days. I subsequently became a school governor and quickly saw just how hard the school leadership teams have to work in delivering a top education in spite of everchanging rules and regulations. I then saw my daughter go through University and Teacher Training and the reality truly struck home. She now works at a local primary school. She leaves home at 7.30 every morning, gets home at 5.30-6pm, then does another 2 hrs minimum planning and marking. Most Sundays she works another 3-4 hrs planning for the following week and approx 25-35% of her holidays are spent working. These people are vital to the very future of our country and we need to ensure that we protect their position in society and retain the best of their profession in the state schools. The school heads are no longer headMASTERS, they are CEOs of companies with budgets running into the millions. One thing education does need is some stability, as every education secretary comes in wishing to reinvent the wheel every 3 yrs meaning that no programme ever really gets established. In that respect Gove is one of the most culpable ever. ianh
  • Score: 9

1:00pm Thu 27 Mar 14

ianh says...

should just add to the above.
my daughter loves her job, helping her kids become the best they can be.
should just add to the above. my daughter loves her job, helping her kids become the best they can be. ianh
  • Score: 5

8:49am Fri 28 Mar 14

MartinMo says...

It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified.

From my experience with teachers I come to the conclusion that to be able to teach you need the following 3 things:

The ability to read, as most lessons are now from pre-set text books. To be able to communicate clearly with those around you, especially children. To air authority whilst maintaining an approachable stature. Approx 80% of teaching staff fail to meet all three of the above.

Here's a good old phrase, " if you can't do something, teach it".

Compared to some professions, for instance, front line military troops, teachers are over paid and underworked.

ianh - if your daughter cared so much about the children she would not be a member of group which contemplated exploiting the childrens education by carrying out strike action.

Teachers don't strike in order to improve the education system, it all stems down to wanting more money in their own annual pay package for the little they actually do. they do.

All public service jobs should be treated like the military in regards to unions, they don't exist, if you refuse to do the job the state pays you for then you are punished.
It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified. From my experience with teachers I come to the conclusion that to be able to teach you need the following 3 things: The ability to read, as most lessons are now from pre-set text books. To be able to communicate clearly with those around you, especially children. To air authority whilst maintaining an approachable stature. Approx 80% of teaching staff fail to meet all three of the above. Here's a good old phrase, " if you can't do something, teach it". Compared to some professions, for instance, front line military troops, teachers are over paid and underworked. ianh - if your daughter cared so much about the children she would not be a member of group which contemplated exploiting the childrens education by carrying out strike action. Teachers don't strike in order to improve the education system, it all stems down to wanting more money in their own annual pay package for the little they actually do. they do. All public service jobs should be treated like the military in regards to unions, they don't exist, if you refuse to do the job the state pays you for then you are punished. MartinMo
  • Score: -4

9:20am Fri 28 Mar 14

ianh says...

MartinMo; It amazes me that those who obviously have not knowledge or understanding of what teaching entails today can condemn teachers from a position of such ignorance.
Perhaps your "experience of teachers" was rather too limited......
MartinMo; It amazes me that those who obviously have not knowledge or understanding of what teaching entails today can condemn teachers from a position of such ignorance. Perhaps your "experience of teachers" was rather too limited...... ianh
  • Score: 5

1:43pm Fri 28 Mar 14

marilyn49 says...

Well said ianh. As a retired teacher with teachers in the family, I agree with your comments As usual on this site the same old faithfuls who regularly post, airing their ignorant opinions .A lot of people just do not know what horrendous changes are taking place in society...schools in particular and the unions need to make a stand . If teaching is so cushy why do 40% of youngsters leave the profession within the first five years? I told my children to do any job they liked -but not teaching because it is not suitable for conscientious people who end -up working themselves into the ground.
Well said ianh. As a retired teacher with teachers in the family, I agree with your comments As usual on this site the same old faithfuls who regularly post, airing their ignorant opinions .A lot of people just do not know what horrendous changes are taking place in society...schools in particular and the unions need to make a stand . If teaching is so cushy why do 40% of youngsters leave the profession within the first five years? I told my children to do any job they liked -but not teaching because it is not suitable for conscientious people who end -up working themselves into the ground. marilyn49
  • Score: 5

6:18pm Sat 29 Mar 14

miketually says...

"It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified."

Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they?
"It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified." Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they? miketually
  • Score: 0

6:50pm Sat 29 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

Britain is no top heavy with far left Marxist Union activity supported by the ********************
**********Daily Shirker.
Britain is no top heavy with far left Marxist Union activity supported by the ******************** **********Daily Shirker. cushybutterfield
  • Score: -2

7:58pm Sat 29 Mar 14

marilyn49 says...

miketually wrote:
"It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified."

Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they?
They dare to because they see that most people outside of education are ignorant of the reality. Ignorant means not knowing the facts ... and unless you have been there you cannot be expected to know the facts. I am ignorant of many things and so would not post comments about them. I appreciate it when experienced people do enlighten readers about the reality that they know .
[quote][p][bold]miketually[/bold] wrote: "It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified." Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they?[/p][/quote]They dare to because they see that most people outside of education are ignorant of the reality. Ignorant means not knowing the facts ... and unless you have been there you cannot be expected to know the facts. I am ignorant of many things and so would not post comments about them. I appreciate it when experienced people do enlighten readers about the reality that they know . marilyn49
  • Score: 0

10:12am Sun 30 Mar 14

thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth says...

kate-m wrote:
thetruthyoucanthandl

ethetruth
wrote:
kate-m wrote:
I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes.

I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour.

I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible.

By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining.

So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it.

I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.
I'd love to see you do my job!

You wouldn't last 5 minutes.

And I love what I do.
Brilliant! Then that's that then, you couldn't handle my job and I couldn't handle yours! So glad we got that one sorted!
I never said I couldn't handle your job!
[quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]thetruthyoucanthandl ethetruth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kate-m[/bold] wrote: I am a teacher. I am part time as I also have a family to look after and support. For those who think we have an 'easy ride' or are a'lazy bunch', I would LOVE for you to spend a term in my shoes. I rush from one class to another, I have paper work coming out of my ears, I get home and realise I haven't had a chance to go to the toilet since I left the house in the morning, let alone getting to eat a lunch . Once I put the children to bed I work for another 2 hours minimum on the computer of an evening. The students I teach are increasingly difficult and the support I get is minimal. If you worked out my wage and compared to the hours I work, I am on roughly £6 per hour. I want to help students, that is my passion but the job is being made to be impossible. By the time the end of term comes I am dead on my feet. I cannot begin to describe how heavy my job is in every way. Physically, emotionally, mentally draining. So for those who think teaching is a walk in the park and the holidays we get are a joke...please...look into becoming a teacher. I'm sure you could handle it. I may meet you one day at one of the strike marches.[/p][/quote]I'd love to see you do my job! You wouldn't last 5 minutes. And I love what I do.[/p][/quote]Brilliant! Then that's that then, you couldn't handle my job and I couldn't handle yours! So glad we got that one sorted![/p][/quote]I never said I couldn't handle your job! thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth
  • Score: 2

10:18am Sun 30 Mar 14

thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth says...

miketually wrote:
"It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified."

Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they?
If the cap fits, feel free to wear it.

The commentators on here are by and large far from ignorant. Seems to me that the whinging lazy militant teachers, believing the world owes them a living because they have a degree, are indeed the ignorant ones living in a world far removed from reality. If you can't stand the heat....
[quote][p][bold]miketually[/bold] wrote: "It amazes me that only those from a teaching background or have family within the teaching environment think they are hard done by and any strike action is justified." Coming here with their facts and experience and countering our ignorant position. How dare they?[/p][/quote]If the cap fits, feel free to wear it. The commentators on here are by and large far from ignorant. Seems to me that the whinging lazy militant teachers, believing the world owes them a living because they have a degree, are indeed the ignorant ones living in a world far removed from reality. If you can't stand the heat.... thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth
  • Score: 1

5:46pm Sun 30 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

Do these Teachers realise ?.... that the world does NOT owe them a living, the have to EARN a living,..........no wonder many **poor kids nowadays despite BILLIONS being spent by British working Taxpayers on 'Schools and Education' cannot read or write. Now hears a arithmetic set of factual circumstances for you, ****Subtract 'All Teacher Paid Holidays',..........
........ 'All Teacher Training Day's. Union Conferences attendances and REAL Teacher hourly exposure to kids in the classroom (which has diminished year by year and has been assessed at hardly Four Hours per School day, plus all absences for failure to get to work in 'winter weather, central heating breaking downs' and sickness and add recurring Teacher STRIKES,. etc, etc, and what is the result, .........in many cases 'half taught kids hardly at school' and they wonder why hardworking parents (non-teachers) get angry and sick of the disgusting so called todays Education system.
Do these Teachers realise ?.... that the world does NOT owe them a living, the have to EARN a living,..........no wonder many **poor kids nowadays despite BILLIONS being spent by British working Taxpayers on 'Schools and Education' cannot read or write. Now hears a arithmetic set of factual circumstances for you, ****Subtract 'All Teacher Paid Holidays',.......... ........ 'All Teacher Training Day's. Union Conferences attendances and REAL Teacher hourly exposure to kids in the classroom (which has diminished year by year and has been assessed at hardly Four Hours per School day, plus all absences for failure to get to work in 'winter weather, central heating breaking downs' and sickness and add recurring Teacher STRIKES,. etc, etc, and what is the result, .........in many cases 'half taught kids hardly at school' and they wonder why hardworking parents (non-teachers) get angry and sick of the disgusting so called todays Education system. cushybutterfield
  • Score: 1

6:46pm Sun 30 Mar 14

marilyn49 says...

Readers can see which posts are from educated people. Amazingly the negative comments about teachers mostly come from people who appear to have bunked-off their English lessons .If it wasn't so sad it would be funny.
Readers can see which posts are from educated people. Amazingly the negative comments about teachers mostly come from people who appear to have bunked-off their English lessons .If it wasn't so sad it would be funny. marilyn49
  • Score: -1

7:22pm Sun 30 Mar 14

thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth says...

marilyn49 wrote:
Readers can see which posts are from educated people. Amazingly the negative comments about teachers mostly come from people who appear to have bunked-off their English lessons .If it wasn't so sad it would be funny.
Tut tut. You need a space after a full stop.

Uneducated cretin.
[quote][p][bold]marilyn49[/bold] wrote: Readers can see which posts are from educated people. Amazingly the negative comments about teachers mostly come from people who appear to have bunked-off their English lessons .If it wasn't so sad it would be funny.[/p][/quote]Tut tut. You need a space after a full stop. Uneducated cretin. thetruthyoucanthandlethetruth
  • Score: 0

10:27am Mon 31 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

Well if some Teachers actually 'attended school on a regular basis' and taught more, all our English might have been better. Your highest standard of teaching was in the good old reliable consistent, **** 195Os mainly carried out by hardworking, reliable 'experience Ex Servicemen' (many self taught), who came and taught on a very professional and exemplary level, in schools and on a consistent and regular basis, with a long school day finishing at 4.3Op.m. with half the holidays and 'days off that teachers all get now'.
Well if some Teachers actually 'attended school on a regular basis' and taught more, all our English might have been better. Your highest standard of teaching was in the good old reliable consistent, **** 195Os mainly carried out by hardworking, reliable 'experience Ex Servicemen' (many self taught), who came and taught on a very professional and exemplary level, in schools and on a consistent and regular basis, with a long school day finishing at 4.3Op.m. with half the holidays and 'days off that teachers all get now'. cushybutterfield
  • Score: 1

11:32am Mon 31 Mar 14

ianh says...

I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school?
It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended.
The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement.
From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers.

Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education.
Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone?
I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school? It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended. The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement. From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers. Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education. Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone? ianh
  • Score: -1

12:37pm Mon 31 Mar 14

miketually says...

ianh wrote:
I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school?
It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended.
The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement.
From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers.

Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education.
Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone?
That echoes my experiences of the differing standard of education and care my daughters are receiving compared to my own experience at primary school.
[quote][p][bold]ianh[/bold] wrote: I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school? It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended. The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement. From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers. Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education. Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone?[/p][/quote]That echoes my experiences of the differing standard of education and care my daughters are receiving compared to my own experience at primary school. miketually
  • Score: 2

2:02pm Mon 31 Mar 14

MartinMo says...

ianh wrote:
I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school?
It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended.
The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement.
From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers.

Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education.
Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone?
They coasted to retirement.......wou
ld prefer that for my kids rather than teachers coating from to the next strike action or holiday.

I did teach, but in the military environment, harsher terrain, teen to adult students and all for a more worthy end result, keeping them alive. I did this for less money than state school teachers claim and a lot less time off per annun.

Most teachers need to learn that there are a lot more tasking professions out there and they are done for less money.
[quote][p][bold]ianh[/bold] wrote: I wonder how long it has been since many of these people posting actually went into a state school? It was certainly an experience for me when my children started at the same Secondary school that i attended. The standards of education and pastoral care are FAR higher than for my generation. Even though i was lucky enough to be taught by several excellent and inspiring teachers, there were plenty of other at the time who were simply coasting to retirement. From my own perspective it is very different today, despite Mr Goves attempts to undermine so much of the good work being done by teachers. Suppose thats what happens when you put a former journalist in charge of education. Jeremy Clarkson to run the treasury anyone?[/p][/quote]They coasted to retirement.......wou ld prefer that for my kids rather than teachers coating from to the next strike action or holiday. I did teach, but in the military environment, harsher terrain, teen to adult students and all for a more worthy end result, keeping them alive. I did this for less money than state school teachers claim and a lot less time off per annun. Most teachers need to learn that there are a lot more tasking professions out there and they are done for less money. MartinMo
  • Score: -1

2:32pm Mon 31 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

The problem is some of these Teaching Unions now have been infiltrated by the 'bone idle workshy far left and Marxist propaganda'. I would love to see a league time in motion study table of all Teachers outlining exactly how many times THEY REGULARLY ATTENDED school during their so called working-year and I am certain the results would be sheer ****transparency amazing.
The problem is some of these Teaching Unions now have been infiltrated by the 'bone idle workshy far left and Marxist propaganda'. I would love to see a league time in motion study table of all Teachers outlining exactly how many times THEY REGULARLY ATTENDED school during their so called working-year and I am certain the results would be sheer ****transparency amazing. cushybutterfield
  • Score: 0

3:09pm Mon 31 Mar 14

ianh says...

"...a more worthy end result"...
Worthy indeed, but a very different set of circumstances.

Teachers are tasked with ensuring that every child can maximise their life chances and be the best that they can be.
A most crucial and indeed "worthy" end result i would suggest.
"...a more worthy end result"... Worthy indeed, but a very different set of circumstances. Teachers are tasked with ensuring that every child can maximise their life chances and be the best that they can be. A most crucial and indeed "worthy" end result i would suggest. ianh
  • Score: 0

3:52pm Mon 31 Mar 14

cushybutterfield says...

Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..
Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand.. cushybutterfield
  • Score: -4

4:45pm Mon 31 Mar 14

miketually says...

cushybutterfield wrote:
Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..
Irony?
[quote][p][bold]cushybutterfield[/bold] wrote: Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..[/p][/quote]Irony? miketually
  • Score: 0

6:50pm Mon 31 Mar 14

ianh says...

cushybutterfield wrote:
Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..
"gooblegook"????
left wing???
marxist?

Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought?
[quote][p][bold]cushybutterfield[/bold] wrote: Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..[/p][/quote]"gooblegook"???? left wing??? marxist? Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought? ianh
  • Score: -1

8:49am Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

ianh wrote:
cushybutterfield wrote:
Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..
"gooblegook"???
?
left wing???
marxist?

Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought?
But we all know this is simply not the case. How on earth will striking for more money in their own pockets push the kids to be the best they can, it would in fact have the opposite affect given the lack of education during any strike action.

Before you srat your waffle, they do not do it for the betterment of the system, it's all about money. They were happy to take the position with all that was required for the offered salary but once in seat and comfortable their true colours rise and they start to demand more, and for what, their own personal gain which displays a total disregard for the kids under their care.

Parents push kids to be the best they can, teachers just **** and label kids based on work they produce.
[quote][p][bold]ianh[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cushybutterfield[/bold] wrote: Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..[/p][/quote]"gooblegook"??? ? left wing??? marxist? Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought?[/p][/quote]But we all know this is simply not the case. How on earth will striking for more money in their own pockets push the kids to be the best they can, it would in fact have the opposite affect given the lack of education during any strike action. Before you srat your waffle, they do not do it for the betterment of the system, it's all about money. They were happy to take the position with all that was required for the offered salary but once in seat and comfortable their true colours rise and they start to demand more, and for what, their own personal gain which displays a total disregard for the kids under their care. Parents push kids to be the best they can, teachers just **** and label kids based on work they produce. MartinMo
  • Score: 0

8:54am Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

Omg........why did assess (a s s e s s) get censored in my last post.
Omg........why did assess (a s s e s s) get censored in my last post. MartinMo
  • Score: -2

8:54am Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

But not in that one?
But not in that one? MartinMo
  • Score: -1

9:25am Tue 1 Apr 14

miketually says...

MartinMo wrote:
ianh wrote:
cushybutterfield wrote:
Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..
"gooblegook"???

?
left wing???
marxist?

Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought?
But we all know this is simply not the case. How on earth will striking for more money in their own pockets push the kids to be the best they can, it would in fact have the opposite affect given the lack of education during any strike action.

Before you srat your waffle, they do not do it for the betterment of the system, it's all about money. They were happy to take the position with all that was required for the offered salary but once in seat and comfortable their true colours rise and they start to demand more, and for what, their own personal gain which displays a total disregard for the kids under their care.

Parents push kids to be the best they can, teachers just **** and label kids based on work they produce.
Teachers aren't striking for more money or a better pension, they're striking to keep their existing pension and to not have performance related pay. The motivation is to keep encouraging high quality teachers into the profession in the future.
[quote][p][bold]MartinMo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ianh[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cushybutterfield[/bold] wrote: Eh........IANH. instead of Teacher modern day *** gobblegook type proper 'non-politically correct, non-politically Marxist left wing point scoring' understandable English so that decent hard working 'non-teaching working class' WORKING people can fully understand..[/p][/quote]"gooblegook"??? ? left wing??? marxist? Give every child the opportunity to be the best they can be.....really a rather simple message i would have thought?[/p][/quote]But we all know this is simply not the case. How on earth will striking for more money in their own pockets push the kids to be the best they can, it would in fact have the opposite affect given the lack of education during any strike action. Before you srat your waffle, they do not do it for the betterment of the system, it's all about money. They were happy to take the position with all that was required for the offered salary but once in seat and comfortable their true colours rise and they start to demand more, and for what, their own personal gain which displays a total disregard for the kids under their care. Parents push kids to be the best they can, teachers just **** and label kids based on work they produce.[/p][/quote]Teachers aren't striking for more money or a better pension, they're striking to keep their existing pension and to not have performance related pay. The motivation is to keep encouraging high quality teachers into the profession in the future. miketually
  • Score: 1

10:16am Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

ok, surely if the motivation is to keep encouraging high quality teachers in to the profession, plus retaining currently employed so called high quality teachers then performance related pay would be a good thing. It would seperate the high quality teachers from those whom do in fact coast from one holiday to the next.

Not all teachers took part in the past strike action, this would tell me that they are the high quality teachers whilst those against performance related salaries are failing to meet the required education standards and are fearful of loosing money............so in a round about way, still money orientated.
ok, surely if the motivation is to keep encouraging high quality teachers in to the profession, plus retaining currently employed so called high quality teachers then performance related pay would be a good thing. It would seperate the high quality teachers from those whom do in fact coast from one holiday to the next. Not all teachers took part in the past strike action, this would tell me that they are the high quality teachers whilst those against performance related salaries are failing to meet the required education standards and are fearful of loosing money............so in a round about way, still money orientated. MartinMo
  • Score: -1

11:12am Tue 1 Apr 14

ianh says...

How would performance related salaries be assessed?

Teacher A works in a small secondary school in a nice village. Most residents would be regarded as affluent and therefore more likely to have had an appreciation of the importance of education for their children. Those children will therefore be provided with an environment at home and school that is conducive to learning.

Teacher B works in a large secondary in a deprived urban setting. For many of the children english will be a second language whilst others may be travellers and not attend school for much of the year. Many of these children will have poorly educated parents and a home life far less conducive to learning.

So who is the "better" teacher?
Teacher A who has all pupils achieving A 's at GCSE or
Teacher B who manages to get half the children to achieve a C grade in english.

Whilst there are tools to **** a school overall (contextualised value added) they cannot assess individual teachers due to the huge variance in the individual intakes.

These are real scenarios played out every day in every area of the country, including darlington.

All performance related pay will result in are more "sink" schools with all the "good " teachers working in the more affluent areas.

By keeping the pay structures in place it ensures that all schools have an equal opportunity to attract the best teachers.
How would performance related salaries be assessed? Teacher A works in a small secondary school in a nice village. Most residents would be regarded as affluent and therefore more likely to have had an appreciation of the importance of education for their children. Those children will therefore be provided with an environment at home and school that is conducive to learning. Teacher B works in a large secondary in a deprived urban setting. For many of the children english will be a second language whilst others may be travellers and not attend school for much of the year. Many of these children will have poorly educated parents and a home life far less conducive to learning. So who is the "better" teacher? Teacher A who has all pupils achieving A 's at GCSE or Teacher B who manages to get half the children to achieve a C grade in english. Whilst there are tools to **** a school overall (contextualised value added) they cannot assess individual teachers due to the huge variance in the individual intakes. These are real scenarios played out every day in every area of the country, including darlington. All performance related pay will result in are more "sink" schools with all the "good " teachers working in the more affluent areas. By keeping the pay structures in place it ensures that all schools have an equal opportunity to attract the best teachers. ianh
  • Score: 3

11:45am Tue 1 Apr 14

miketually says...

We'd also have problems within schools: If a teacher's salary relies on them performing relatively better than their colleagues, are they more or less likely to collaborate and share resources?
We'd also have problems within schools: If a teacher's salary relies on them performing relatively better than their colleagues, are they more or less likely to collaborate and share resources? miketually
  • Score: 3

12:51pm Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

ianh, you keep using the terms high quality and good when talking about teachers, therefore I am to assume that in there are good/ high quality teachers then there must also be bad/low quality teachers, (those unable to teach to the required education standard). Why should these teachers be on the same level of pay.

A good teacher is one whom can control and teach even the unruliest of pupils by making the subject interesting to the class and should be justly rewarded for educational achievements. A bad teacher is one whom lacks authority in the classroom and conducts lessons direct from the text books and should really look for another profession rather trying to justify keeping hold of their salary by passing fault to that of the childs parents/up bringing.

I am not saying that there are truely bad teachers out there but it's blatantly obvious there are those whom do a better job, oddly enough most of those chose not to take part in the recent strike action......why was that? One possible reason is because they know they truth of the matter.
ianh, you keep using the terms high quality and good when talking about teachers, therefore I am to assume that in there are good/ high quality teachers then there must also be bad/low quality teachers, (those unable to teach to the required education standard). Why should these teachers be on the same level of pay. A good teacher is one whom can control and teach even the unruliest of pupils by making the subject interesting to the class and should be justly rewarded for educational achievements. A bad teacher is one whom lacks authority in the classroom and conducts lessons direct from the text books and should really look for another profession rather trying to justify keeping hold of their salary by passing fault to that of the childs parents/up bringing. I am not saying that there are truely bad teachers out there but it's blatantly obvious there are those whom do a better job, oddly enough most of those chose not to take part in the recent strike action......why was that? One possible reason is because they know they truth of the matter. MartinMo
  • Score: -2

2:50pm Tue 1 Apr 14

miketually says...

MartinMo wrote:
ianh, you keep using the terms high quality and good when talking about teachers, therefore I am to assume that in there are good/ high quality teachers then there must also be bad/low quality teachers, (those unable to teach to the required education standard). Why should these teachers be on the same level of pay.

A good teacher is one whom can control and teach even the unruliest of pupils by making the subject interesting to the class and should be justly rewarded for educational achievements. A bad teacher is one whom lacks authority in the classroom and conducts lessons direct from the text books and should really look for another profession rather trying to justify keeping hold of their salary by passing fault to that of the childs parents/up bringing.

I am not saying that there are truely bad teachers out there but it's blatantly obvious there are those whom do a better job, oddly enough most of those chose not to take part in the recent strike action......why was that? One possible reason is because they know they truth of the matter.
If you're a bad teacher, it's an absolutely awful job and most leave the profession very quickly.

Do you have any evidence that good teachers didn't strike in the last action? I don't know of any.
[quote][p][bold]MartinMo[/bold] wrote: ianh, you keep using the terms high quality and good when talking about teachers, therefore I am to assume that in there are good/ high quality teachers then there must also be bad/low quality teachers, (those unable to teach to the required education standard). Why should these teachers be on the same level of pay. A good teacher is one whom can control and teach even the unruliest of pupils by making the subject interesting to the class and should be justly rewarded for educational achievements. A bad teacher is one whom lacks authority in the classroom and conducts lessons direct from the text books and should really look for another profession rather trying to justify keeping hold of their salary by passing fault to that of the childs parents/up bringing. I am not saying that there are truely bad teachers out there but it's blatantly obvious there are those whom do a better job, oddly enough most of those chose not to take part in the recent strike action......why was that? One possible reason is because they know they truth of the matter.[/p][/quote]If you're a bad teacher, it's an absolutely awful job and most leave the profession very quickly. Do you have any evidence that good teachers didn't strike in the last action? I don't know of any. miketually
  • Score: 3

2:52pm Tue 1 Apr 14

ianh says...

But you didnt answer the question; how would you assess the performance of a teacher in the typical scenario outlined above?
Who would get the higher pay and who would set/ interpret any assessment criteria?
Another level of bureaucracy within ofsted (imagine the cost of termly or yearly inspections) or add the costs to the cash-strapped schools, setting teacher against teacher.?

I am afraid performance related pay for teachers is yet another Gove headline intended to be tabloid friendly but would be extremely damaging in reality.

Of course some teachers are "better" than others, just as in any other job or profession, but very few of us are exposed to the level of oversight (from pupils, parents, heads of dept, schools heads/govs, LA, ofsted, and ultimately government) as are teachers.
But you didnt answer the question; how would you assess the performance of a teacher in the typical scenario outlined above? Who would get the higher pay and who would set/ interpret any assessment criteria? Another level of bureaucracy within ofsted (imagine the cost of termly or yearly inspections) or add the costs to the cash-strapped schools, setting teacher against teacher.? I am afraid performance related pay for teachers is yet another Gove headline intended to be tabloid friendly but would be extremely damaging in reality. Of course some teachers are "better" than others, just as in any other job or profession, but very few of us are exposed to the level of oversight (from pupils, parents, heads of dept, schools heads/govs, LA, ofsted, and ultimately government) as are teachers. ianh
  • Score: 2

3:18pm Tue 1 Apr 14

MartinMo says...

miketually, you cannot make a statement like that in this day and age, yes a bad will eventually leave the profession but only when they have something to move too (generally for a higher salalry). Until that moment comes they would continue being a bad teacher and claim the same salary as their decent counterpart.

Evidence......well my kids were not affected too greatly during the last strike action because most of their teachers refused to take part, obviously decent teachers with nothing to fear with introducing performance related pay.

ianh.........There is no such thing as a typical scenario but I have a real life scenario. I have 2 kids, the eldest go to DSMS in Darlo, we applied for Hummersknot but the position was declined due enctchment areas at the time. A year later my youngest started secondary school and we tried for Hummersknot again as this is meant to be the better of the two and this time we were suucessful. Due to friendships made we decided against moving the eldest. Nearly 3 years after the eldest started secondary school we did not expect to the child in the so called rougher of the two schools to be achieving higher grades and expectations but yet it's a matter of fact. That can only lead me to believe, given both kids (same sex) are given the same amount of encouragement at home, that the teachers in DSMS have a higher ability and greater commitment to teaching the pupils with their care.

I have met teachers, some I would have the highest respect whilst others I find it hard to belive they themselves are educated enough to even sweep the streets never mind teach.
miketually, you cannot make a statement like that in this day and age, yes a bad will eventually leave the profession but only when they have something to move too (generally for a higher salalry). Until that moment comes they would continue being a bad teacher and claim the same salary as their decent counterpart. Evidence......well my kids were not affected too greatly during the last strike action because most of their teachers refused to take part, obviously decent teachers with nothing to fear with introducing performance related pay. ianh.........There is no such thing as a typical scenario but I have a real life scenario. I have 2 kids, the eldest go to DSMS in Darlo, we applied for Hummersknot but the position was declined due enctchment areas at the time. A year later my youngest started secondary school and we tried for Hummersknot again as this is meant to be the better of the two and this time we were suucessful. Due to friendships made we decided against moving the eldest. Nearly 3 years after the eldest started secondary school we did not expect to the child in the so called rougher of the two schools to be achieving higher grades and expectations but yet it's a matter of fact. That can only lead me to believe, given both kids (same sex) are given the same amount of encouragement at home, that the teachers in DSMS have a higher ability and greater commitment to teaching the pupils with their care. I have met teachers, some I would have the highest respect whilst others I find it hard to belive they themselves are educated enough to even sweep the streets never mind teach. MartinMo
  • Score: -2

4:20pm Tue 1 Apr 14

miketually says...

MartinMo wrote:
miketually, you cannot make a statement like that in this day and age, yes a bad will eventually leave the profession but only when they have something to move too (generally for a higher salalry). Until that moment comes they would continue being a bad teacher and claim the same salary as their decent counterpart.

Evidence......well my kids were not affected too greatly during the last strike action because most of their teachers refused to take part, obviously decent teachers with nothing to fear with introducing performance related pay.

ianh.........There is no such thing as a typical scenario but I have a real life scenario. I have 2 kids, the eldest go to DSMS in Darlo, we applied for Hummersknot but the position was declined due enctchment areas at the time. A year later my youngest started secondary school and we tried for Hummersknot again as this is meant to be the better of the two and this time we were suucessful. Due to friendships made we decided against moving the eldest. Nearly 3 years after the eldest started secondary school we did not expect to the child in the so called rougher of the two schools to be achieving higher grades and expectations but yet it's a matter of fact. That can only lead me to believe, given both kids (same sex) are given the same amount of encouragement at home, that the teachers in DSMS have a higher ability and greater commitment to teaching the pupils with their care.

I have met teachers, some I would have the highest respect whilst others I find it hard to belive they themselves are educated enough to even sweep the streets never mind teach.
Believe me, bad teachers don't stay in the profession for long and they don't hang on until they have a better salary job to move to. 40% of NQTs leave within 5 years...

Were your kids not affected by the strikes because the teachers chose not to take part, or because they weren't members of the NUT?

I'm impressed that you can make judgements on teaching quality based on just two children. Does your conclusion agree with results and Ofsted?
[quote][p][bold]MartinMo[/bold] wrote: miketually, you cannot make a statement like that in this day and age, yes a bad will eventually leave the profession but only when they have something to move too (generally for a higher salalry). Until that moment comes they would continue being a bad teacher and claim the same salary as their decent counterpart. Evidence......well my kids were not affected too greatly during the last strike action because most of their teachers refused to take part, obviously decent teachers with nothing to fear with introducing performance related pay. ianh.........There is no such thing as a typical scenario but I have a real life scenario. I have 2 kids, the eldest go to DSMS in Darlo, we applied for Hummersknot but the position was declined due enctchment areas at the time. A year later my youngest started secondary school and we tried for Hummersknot again as this is meant to be the better of the two and this time we were suucessful. Due to friendships made we decided against moving the eldest. Nearly 3 years after the eldest started secondary school we did not expect to the child in the so called rougher of the two schools to be achieving higher grades and expectations but yet it's a matter of fact. That can only lead me to believe, given both kids (same sex) are given the same amount of encouragement at home, that the teachers in DSMS have a higher ability and greater commitment to teaching the pupils with their care. I have met teachers, some I would have the highest respect whilst others I find it hard to belive they themselves are educated enough to even sweep the streets never mind teach.[/p][/quote]Believe me, bad teachers don't stay in the profession for long and they don't hang on until they have a better salary job to move to. 40% of NQTs leave within 5 years... Were your kids not affected by the strikes because the teachers chose not to take part, or because they weren't members of the NUT? I'm impressed that you can make judgements on teaching quality based on just two children. Does your conclusion agree with results and Ofsted? miketually
  • Score: 1

4:34pm Tue 1 Apr 14

ianh says...

DCMS has indeed improved a very great deal in the last couple of years, new, quality leadership has helped transform the school which is excellent news for everyone.
I would suggest that had Performance Related Pay been in place a school such as DCMS may have struggled to attract the quality of staff that have made such a tremendous difference (try looking at performance tables from 10yrs ago, when DBC were secretly planning its closure.)
DCMS has indeed improved a very great deal in the last couple of years, new, quality leadership has helped transform the school which is excellent news for everyone. I would suggest that had Performance Related Pay been in place a school such as DCMS may have struggled to attract the quality of staff that have made such a tremendous difference (try looking at performance tables from 10yrs ago, when DBC were secretly planning its closure.) ianh
  • Score: 0

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