Firefighters strike on New Year's Eve in long-running pensions dispute

The Northern Echo: Firefighters on the picket line in Durham City last night Firefighters on the picket line in Durham City last night

FIREFIGHTERS across the region took part in strike action last night (Tuesday, December 31) as part of their long-running dispute with the Government over pension changes.

Members of the Fire Brigades Union (FBU) manned picket lines, including several outside Durham Fire Station and HQ in Durham City (pictured), after they walked out between 6.30pm on New Years Eve and 12.30am today (Wednesday).

FBU General Secretary, Matt Wrack, said: "None of us wanted these strikes, but firefighters on duty over the festive period don't have much to celebrate this year as they are being priced out of their pensions and face the sack because the Government can't accept that 60-year-old men and women can't meet the same fitness standards as 20-year-olds."

The union said most firefighters who take home approximately £1,650 a month already pay £320 or more a month into their pensions, and from April 2014 this would rise for the third year in a row to more than £340 a month.

Mr Wrack added: "It's time the Government came back with a realistic offer instead of the unworkable proposals they continue to peddle."

A further strike across England and Wales is scheduled for between 6.30am and 8.30am on Friday (January 3).

Comments (4)

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8:04am Wed 1 Jan 14

BMD says...

Typical Union (Labour) economics, using the above figures-

A firefighter takes home £1,650 a month (after deductions)
The current monthly pension is £320 (I assume they are happy paying)
The monthly pension increase is £20
The annual pension increase is £240

If they plan to strike for 3 days, their take home pay is deducted by £247.50
So basically they have stood outside with a placard and lost more than the pension increase.
Typical Union (Labour) economics, using the above figures- A firefighter takes home £1,650 a month (after deductions) The current monthly pension is £320 (I assume they are happy paying) The monthly pension increase is £20 The annual pension increase is £240 If they plan to strike for 3 days, their take home pay is deducted by £247.50 So basically they have stood outside with a placard and lost more than the pension increase. BMD

8:22am Wed 1 Jan 14

darloboss says...

overpaid and under worked if your not happy get a proper job and work for a living
overpaid and under worked if your not happy get a proper job and work for a living darloboss

10:57am Tue 7 Jan 14

drc55rosemary says...

How disgusting the above comment is. This person has no idea of what the job entails. Underworked? overpaid? proper job, what would that be then?

Did they read the article at all? How is someone who takes home about £1,330 after a hefty pension, which the government says they can't touch until their 65. How many actually live that long after they are retired on ill health grounds at 55 or so, because they are deemed by rigid fitness tests as unfit?

Mental, if a person is retired on medical grounds, they should be allowed the pension that they themselves have paid. Absolutely disgusting!
drc55rosemary
How disgusting the above comment is. This person has no idea of what the job entails. Underworked? overpaid? proper job, what would that be then? Did they read the article at all? How is someone who takes home about £1,330 after a hefty pension, which the government says they can't touch until their 65. How many actually live that long after they are retired on ill health grounds at 55 or so, because they are deemed by rigid fitness tests as unfit? Mental, if a person is retired on medical grounds, they should be allowed the pension that they themselves have paid. Absolutely disgusting! drc55rosemary drc55rosemary

11:04am Tue 7 Jan 14

drc55rosemary says...

drc55rosemary wrote:
How disgusting the above comment is. This person has no idea of what the job entails. Underworked? overpaid? proper job, what would that be then?

Did they read the article at all? How is someone who takes home about £1,330 after a hefty pension, which the government says they can't touch until their 65. How many actually live that long after they are retired on ill health grounds at 55 or so, because they are deemed by rigid fitness tests as unfit?

Mental, if a person is retired on medical grounds, they should be allowed the pension that they themselves have paid. Absolutely disgusting!
drc55rosemary
In the same scenario I was allowed my pension as a teacher, so why are their different rules for fire fighters? Surely, we are all service sector workers!

drc55rosemary
[quote][p][bold]drc55rosemary[/bold] wrote: How disgusting the above comment is. This person has no idea of what the job entails. Underworked? overpaid? proper job, what would that be then? Did they read the article at all? How is someone who takes home about £1,330 after a hefty pension, which the government says they can't touch until their 65. How many actually live that long after they are retired on ill health grounds at 55 or so, because they are deemed by rigid fitness tests as unfit? Mental, if a person is retired on medical grounds, they should be allowed the pension that they themselves have paid. Absolutely disgusting! drc55rosemary[/p][/quote]In the same scenario I was allowed my pension as a teacher, so why are their different rules for fire fighters? Surely, we are all service sector workers! drc55rosemary drc55rosemary

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