Tanker and coach drivers 'lucky to be alive' after crash

The Northern Echo: A map of the crash A map of the crash

THE drivers of a milk tanker and a coach were said to be lucky to be alive after crashing into an abandoned stolen camper van at an accident black spot.

The National Express coach heading for Whitby on the A171, near Scaling Dam, hit the VW Transporter camper van, which had been taken from the Cleveland area, as it was on the side of the unlit road in a hidden dip.

Shortly after the initial crash at 5.50am yesterday (Wednesday, January 2), a milk tanker which was heading towards Guisborough, ploughed into the coach and van.

Firefighters rescued the trapped driver of the coach, which was not carrying passengers, by smashing his windscreen.

The coach driver was uninjured, but the milk tanker driver was treated at the scene for facial cuts by paramedics after his head hit the windscreen in the crash.

The road remained closed for five hours after the crash as investigators examined the scene.

It is believed the camper van may have run out of fuel after being stolen on New Year’s Day from Duncan Place, Loftus.

A North Yorkshire Police spokesman said: ““It was fortunate there were no fatalities. This could have been very serious.

“This was a senseless and irresponsible place to abandon the camper van and officers are very keen to speak to anyone who saw it in the area prior to the acccident.”

Last September, a vehicle carrying a family of six from Stockton overturned at the same spot after swerving to avoid another vehicle which had allegedly been travelling on the wrong side of the road.

A motorcyclist was killed at the blackspot, which has signs warning of a hidden dip, five years ago, following a multi-vehicle pile-up.

Anyone with information about the camper van theft should call Cleveland Police on 101.

Comments (6)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:40pm Wed 2 Jan 13

for30001 says...

Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so.
Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so. for30001

10:30pm Wed 2 Jan 13

Blankface says...

for30001 wrote:
Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so.
Did you read the bit where it said Hidden dip, just because they professional drivers doesn't give them special powers.
[quote][p][bold]for30001[/bold] wrote: Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so.[/p][/quote]Did you read the bit where it said Hidden dip, just because they professional drivers doesn't give them special powers. Blankface

10:30pm Wed 2 Jan 13

hottopic says...

for30001 wrote:
Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so.
The article says it is an "Accident Blackspot", the fact 2 professional drivers had an accident in this same spot in a short period of time supports it being an accident blackspot. Presumptuous comment to say the least.
[quote][p][bold]for30001[/bold] wrote: Two supposedly professional drivers, I don't think so.[/p][/quote]The article says it is an "Accident Blackspot", the fact 2 professional drivers had an accident in this same spot in a short period of time supports it being an accident blackspot. Presumptuous comment to say the least. hottopic

4:41am Thu 3 Jan 13

for30001 says...

Take extra care on country roads and reduce your speed at approaches to bends, which can be sharper than they appear, and at junctions and turnings, which may be partially hidden. Be prepared for pedestrians, horse riders, cyclists, slow-moving farm vehicles or mud on the road surface. Make sure you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear. You should also reduce your speed where country roads enter villages.

Adapt your driving to the appropriate type and condition of road you are on. In particular, do not treat speed limits as a target. It is often not appropriate or safe to drive at the maximum speed limit take the road and traffic conditions into account. Be prepared for unexpected or difficult situations, for example, the road being blocked beyond a blind bend. Be prepared to adjust your speed as a precaution.

Sections 146 &154 from the Highway Code. They could not stop within the distance they could be see to be clear, they are therefore guilty of driving without due care and attention. Hardly presumptuous, just accurate.
Take extra care on country roads and reduce your speed at approaches to bends, which can be sharper than they appear, and at junctions and turnings, which may be partially hidden. Be prepared for pedestrians, horse riders, cyclists, slow-moving farm vehicles or mud on the road surface. Make sure you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear. You should also reduce your speed where country roads enter villages. Adapt your driving to the appropriate type and condition of road you are on. In particular, do not treat speed limits as a target. It is often not appropriate or safe to drive at the maximum speed limit take the road and traffic conditions into account. Be prepared for unexpected or difficult situations, for example, the road being blocked beyond a blind bend. Be prepared to adjust your speed as a precaution. Sections 146 &154 from the Highway Code. They could not stop within the distance they could be see to be clear, they are therefore guilty of driving without due care and attention. Hardly presumptuous, just accurate. for30001

9:26am Thu 3 Jan 13

Jimmyjack says...

for30001 wrote:
Take extra care on country roads and reduce your speed at approaches to bends, which can be sharper than they appear, and at junctions and turnings, which may be partially hidden. Be prepared for pedestrians, horse riders, cyclists, slow-moving farm vehicles or mud on the road surface. Make sure you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear. You should also reduce your speed where country roads enter villages.

Adapt your driving to the appropriate type and condition of road you are on. In particular, do not treat speed limits as a target. It is often not appropriate or safe to drive at the maximum speed limit take the road and traffic conditions into account. Be prepared for unexpected or difficult situations, for example, the road being blocked beyond a blind bend. Be prepared to adjust your speed as a precaution.

Sections 146 &154 from the Highway Code. They could not stop within the distance they could be see to be clear, they are therefore guilty of driving without due care and attention. Hardly presumptuous, just accurate.
Tom Topper? Is that you?!
[quote][p][bold]for30001[/bold] wrote: Take extra care on country roads and reduce your speed at approaches to bends, which can be sharper than they appear, and at junctions and turnings, which may be partially hidden. Be prepared for pedestrians, horse riders, cyclists, slow-moving farm vehicles or mud on the road surface. Make sure you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear. You should also reduce your speed where country roads enter villages. Adapt your driving to the appropriate type and condition of road you are on. In particular, do not treat speed limits as a target. It is often not appropriate or safe to drive at the maximum speed limit take the road and traffic conditions into account. Be prepared for unexpected or difficult situations, for example, the road being blocked beyond a blind bend. Be prepared to adjust your speed as a precaution. Sections 146 &154 from the Highway Code. They could not stop within the distance they could be see to be clear, they are therefore guilty of driving without due care and attention. Hardly presumptuous, just accurate.[/p][/quote]Tom Topper? Is that you?! Jimmyjack

2:47pm Thu 3 Jan 13

glyn says...

Driving with out due care and attention. How many vehicles DID avoid it.
Driving with out due care and attention. How many vehicles DID avoid it. glyn

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree