THESE postcards are taken from a new book, Northumberland Railway Stations on Old Picture Postcards by George Nairn, the renowned postcard collector from Chester-le-Street. It is a follow-up to his 2019 book which looked at County Durham railway stations.

The new book contains 69 images from the golden age of postcards around the time of the First World War.

It costs £4.95 and is published by Reflections of a Bygone Age. It is available via Waterstones and Amazon, and also from the publisher’s website, postcardcollecting.co.uk

The Northern Echo: Ladies in Edwardian finery wait at Tarset station, near Kielder forest and reservoir, for the train from Hexham to take them on the Border Counties Railway towards Reedsmouth

Ladies in Edwardian finery wait at Tarset station, near Kielder forest and reservoir, for the train from Hexham to take them on the Border Counties Railway towards Reedsmouth

The Northern Echo: The inside of Newcastle Central Station on a postcard sent to Whitby in August 1908. On the left is a large clock, made by Potts of Leeds, a famous firm which was founded by William Potts, who was born in Salt Yard, Darlington. A memorial clock to Mr

The inside of Newcastle Central Station on a postcard sent to Whitby in August 1908. On the left is a large clock, made by Potts of Leeds, a famous firm which was founded by William Potts, who was born in Salt Yard, Darlington. A memorial clock to Mr Potts is in the lodge in the centre of Darlington's South Park

The Northern Echo: You might imagine that Haltwhistle is the ultimate railway town, with its name giving instructions to the drivers of steam engines. But you'd be wrong. Haltwhistle, in north east Northumberland on the Newcastle to Carlisle line and in the shadow of

You might imagine that Haltwhistle is the ultimate railway town, with its name giving instructions to the drivers of steam engines. But you'd be wrong. Haltwhistle, in north east Northumberland on the Newcastle to Carlisle line and in the shadow of Hadrian's Wall, is actually of Roman origin. Its name seems to be something about the hill where two watercourses converge - it is at the meeting point of the Haltwhistle Burn and the River South Tyne

The Northern Echo: A rare postcard of Alnmouth North signal box, which opened in 1847 and still controls the East Coast Main Line to this day, although many of the windows on its right hand side have been bricked up, rather ruining its square symmetry. It is at the north

A rare postcard of Alnmouth North signal box, which opened in 1847 and still controls the East Coast Main Line to this day, although many of the windows on its right hand side have been bricked up, rather ruining its square symmetry. It is at the north end of Alnmouth station and after passing it, a northbound train goes over the spectacular Lesbury viaduct, which takes the mainline over the River Aln. The 18 arch viaduct was designed by Robert Stephenson and built in 1849

The Northern Echo: The most northerly station in the book is Scremerston, on the East Coast Main Line. The station operated from 1847 to 1951, and it was the next stop after "Beal for Holy Island". The station, which is now a private house, was designed by

The most northerly station in the book is Scremerston, on the East Coast Main Line. The station operated from 1847 to 1951, and it was the next stop after "Beal for Holy Island". The station, which is now a private house, was designed by Newcastle architect Benjamin Green, who designed most of the North East mainline stations including, of course, Northallerton

The Northern Echo: Northumberland Railway Stations on old picture postcards by George Nairn