Support grows for Northallerton GP Derek Keilloh

The Northern Echo: Growing support: Derek Keilloh Growing support: Derek Keilloh

A GROUNDSWELL of support is developing for the North Yorkshire GP struck off last week for his actions as an Army doctor in Iraq nearly ten years ago.

Hundreds of people have now given their support to a Facebook campaign backing Derek Keilloh, the Northallerton doctor found guilty of misleading and dishonest conduct following the death of an Iraqi prisoner in Basra in 2003.

And a public event is to be held in the town early in the New Year, designed to show the depth of feeling and support within the local community for the now-former doctor and his family.

The meeting will also be used to gauge support for a campaign calling for the decision of the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service to be reversed – and the possible launch of a petition around the town.

Dr Keilloh, now 38, was a newly-qualified doctor with the Queen's Lancashire Regiment when he tried to save 26-year-old detainee Baha Mousa, who had been beaten by British troops.

But although he had suffered 93 injuries, including fractured ribs and a broken nose, the MPTS found the doctor had been repeatedly dishonest when he claimed he did not see any injuries other than dried blood around his nose.

Former patients have now set up a public event in his support which will be held at the Jolly Minister pub on Valley Road, Northallerton, at 6pm on January 7.

Among those planning to attend is local resident Doug Doherty, whose family have been among the doctor’s patients for a number of years.

“There is a lot of feeling locally about this and we want to see a concerted campaign launched to get Dr Keilloh re-instated,” he said.

The Facebook page – Support Local Doctor D. Keilloh – also carries messages of support for the beleaguered doctor, a partner at the town’s Mayford House surgery.

Said one: “Dr Keilloh is an excellent doctor who turned my life around and I am eternally grateful to him. I would trust him implicitly and would not hesitate to make an appointment with him again.”

Another claimed he had been “hung out to dry and career wrecked” to avoid bad PR for the Army while another described Dr Keilloh as a “genuinely caring and talented GP.”

People planning to attend the meeting are asked to signify their intention on the Facebook page.

Comments (13)

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6:18pm Thu 27 Dec 12

davemlds says...

if the community of northallerton want him back then it needs an independent
enquiry to fight his corner good luck to all the campainers
if the community of northallerton want him back then it needs an independent enquiry to fight his corner good luck to all the campainers davemlds
  • Score: 0

6:45pm Thu 27 Dec 12

Fiona Binns says...

Thank you Dave, we are just ordinary people, outraged by the injustice that has happened, and suffering also by the loss of our GP. We desperately need him back, so please, anyone who could tell us how to go about launching an independant enquiry, we would be so grateful
Thank you Dave, we are just ordinary people, outraged by the injustice that has happened, and suffering also by the loss of our GP. We desperately need him back, so please, anyone who could tell us how to go about launching an independant enquiry, we would be so grateful Fiona Binns
  • Score: 0

7:27pm Thu 27 Dec 12

victorjames says...

Dr Keilloh has been badly let down by his superior officers and The Army in general. He's been made a scapegoat. He was not fully trained and from what I've heard was given only a two day takeover period and then dropped into the front line in a war zone. Purely from a practical point of view he appears to have been an excellent family GP and the type of doctor we cannot afford to lose particularly after all his efforts and the expense of qualifying. There must be far less severe reprimands than taking away his living and career. The man who sent him there, Tony Blair, seems to be managing OK
Dr Keilloh has been badly let down by his superior officers and The Army in general. He's been made a scapegoat. He was not fully trained and from what I've heard was given only a two day takeover period and then dropped into the front line in a war zone. Purely from a practical point of view he appears to have been an excellent family GP and the type of doctor we cannot afford to lose particularly after all his efforts and the expense of qualifying. There must be far less severe reprimands than taking away his living and career. The man who sent him there, Tony Blair, seems to be managing OK victorjames
  • Score: 0

8:00pm Thu 27 Dec 12

JOrd8531 says...

Mr Keilloh (he doesn't deserve to be called a Doctor and should have his phD medical degree taken off of him) he got struck off for a reason, because he was dishonest about Mr Mousa's injuries, when he had 93 injuries, including fractured ribs and a broken nose, rather than just blood around his nostrils, plus if he wasn't fully trained he shouldn't have gone over in to a front line war zone, at all let alone for a two day takeover period, someone should fracture his ribs, and brake his nose, then misdiagnose his injuries as just bloody nostrils, so then he'll know how it feels to be in pain, but I do agree that Tony Blair should be made accountable for his crimes of war, in terms of genocide!
Mr Keilloh (he doesn't deserve to be called a Doctor and should have his phD medical degree taken off of him) he got struck off for a reason, because he was dishonest about Mr Mousa's injuries, when he had 93 injuries, including fractured ribs and a broken nose, rather than just blood around his nostrils, plus if he wasn't fully trained he shouldn't have gone over in to a front line war zone, at all let alone for a two day takeover period, someone should fracture his ribs, and brake his nose, then misdiagnose his injuries as just bloody nostrils, so then he'll know how it feels to be in pain, but I do agree that Tony Blair should be made accountable for his crimes of war, in terms of genocide! JOrd8531
  • Score: 0

8:16pm Thu 27 Dec 12

Fiona Binns says...

Dr Keilloh did not mis-diagnose his injuries as a living patient, he was called after he collapsed and did everything to try and save his life. He did not continually lie, thats there opinion, he continually told the truth. It seems to be forgotton that he tried to save him, he did not stand back and do nothing, nor did he commit the horrendous crime of killing this innocent man. You say he should have the same done to him, that makes you no better than the soldier who killed Mr Mousa. You say if he wasnt fully trained then he shouldnt have gone, surely then higher up should held reponsible? Anyone who knows him, are 100% behind him and knows his number 1 priority is his patients and their well being. It is disgusting that he is being blamed and punished. He did not kill this man
Dr Keilloh did not mis-diagnose his injuries as a living patient, he was called after he collapsed and did everything to try and save his life. He did not continually lie, thats there opinion, he continually told the truth. It seems to be forgotton that he tried to save him, he did not stand back and do nothing, nor did he commit the horrendous crime of killing this innocent man. You say he should have the same done to him, that makes you no better than the soldier who killed Mr Mousa. You say if he wasnt fully trained then he shouldnt have gone, surely then higher up should held reponsible? Anyone who knows him, are 100% behind him and knows his number 1 priority is his patients and their well being. It is disgusting that he is being blamed and punished. He did not kill this man Fiona Binns
  • Score: 0

8:40pm Thu 27 Dec 12

victorjames says...

The hearing should have taken into account the circumstances that the doctor found himself in. He did from all accounts do what he could to save Mr Mousa. Having said that he was in a front line situation in which BOTH sides are fully armed. He may, if he'd made a stand, have become a victim of "friendly fire". He was badly let down by his superior officers. Wars a dirty business and I would think that one of your priorities would be coming home alive.
The hearing should have taken into account the circumstances that the doctor found himself in. He did from all accounts do what he could to save Mr Mousa. Having said that he was in a front line situation in which BOTH sides are fully armed. He may, if he'd made a stand, have become a victim of "friendly fire". He was badly let down by his superior officers. Wars a dirty business and I would think that one of your priorities would be coming home alive. victorjames
  • Score: 0

9:27pm Thu 27 Dec 12

johnny_p says...

He was not only a doctor but a serving Army Officer- so in addition to failing attend to Mr Mousa's injuries (innocent hotel worker who was tortured and beaten while in custody) he should have also have acted quickly to report and stop abuse of prisoners in his care.

I am horrified that only non-commissioned officers have so far been charged with abusing prisoners. The officers in the military want all the respect, honour and privileges that go with their rank, but should also be aware of their supervisory responsibilities. What was going on in these military prisons? The officers can either claim that they knew nothing about it, or ignored the abuse which in both cases in a dereliction of duty.

When I served in the military it was always stressed that prisoners should not be mishandled, mistreated or abused in any form whatsoever. This is against the Geneva convention- and is there to protect our own troops as well as those we detain.

I think the GMC are in a far better position to assess what makes a "good doctor" than armchair pundits... this (ex) doctor has behaved disgracefully and is responsible for the death of a man. If he is magically reinstated I will make quite sure non of my family are ever treated by him.
He was not only a doctor but a serving Army Officer- so in addition to failing attend to Mr Mousa's injuries (innocent hotel worker who was tortured and beaten while in custody) he should have also have acted quickly to report and stop abuse of prisoners in his care. I am horrified that only non-commissioned officers have so far been charged with abusing prisoners. The officers in the military want all the respect, honour and privileges that go with their rank, but should also be aware of their supervisory responsibilities. What was going on in these military prisons? The officers can either claim that they knew nothing about it, or ignored the abuse which in both cases in a dereliction of duty. When I served in the military it was always stressed that prisoners should not be mishandled, mistreated or abused in any form whatsoever. This is against the Geneva convention- and is there to protect our own troops as well as those we detain. I think the GMC are in a far better position to assess what makes a "good doctor" than armchair pundits... this (ex) doctor has behaved disgracefully and is responsible for the death of a man. If he is magically reinstated I will make quite sure non of my family are ever treated by him. johnny_p
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Fri 28 Dec 12

john123456 says...

If this ex-doctor had any honour, he would not wish to practice again after his behaviour in Iraq.
If this ex-doctor had any honour, he would not wish to practice again after his behaviour in Iraq. john123456
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Fri 28 Dec 12

The old giffer says...

I feel there is a lot of condemnation here from people who don't know the facts. they can be found at http://www.bahamousa
inquiry.org/f_report
/vol%20iii/Part%20XV
III/Part%20XVIII.pdf
. Dr Keilloh was new in post, and did everything he could to revive Baha Mousa following his assault. There was nothing Dr Keilloh could have done to save him, whether he saw injuries or not, the man was dead. The whole incident is a stain on the reputation of the British Army, but must we castigate anyone associated with the crime simply because they were there?
I feel there is a lot of condemnation here from people who don't know the facts. they can be found at http://www.bahamousa inquiry.org/f_report /vol%20iii/Part%20XV III/Part%20XVIII.pdf . Dr Keilloh was new in post, and did everything he could to revive Baha Mousa following his assault. There was nothing Dr Keilloh could have done to save him, whether he saw injuries or not, the man was dead. The whole incident is a stain on the reputation of the British Army, but must we castigate anyone associated with the crime simply because they were there? The old giffer
  • Score: 0

10:29pm Fri 28 Dec 12

outragedofmiltonkeynes says...

The facts are not known by anyone commenting on this matter. I also suspect that nobody who has commented has experience of active service in a conflict. Opinions on this matter should be given very carefully other than those of this mans patients which should be listened to and acted upon.
The facts are not known by anyone commenting on this matter. I also suspect that nobody who has commented has experience of active service in a conflict. Opinions on this matter should be given very carefully other than those of this mans patients which should be listened to and acted upon. outragedofmiltonkeynes
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Sat 29 Dec 12

Smuggler says...

I agree ,this newly qualified doctor was in a war zone and "not experienced " in handling the situation and yes it probably made the mistake in the tension of battle and misguided loyalty.the you man dies a second chance there are many doctors out there who have do worse and be punished less. Give him another chance.
I agree ,this newly qualified doctor was in a war zone and "not experienced " in handling the situation and yes it probably made the mistake in the tension of battle and misguided loyalty.the you man dies a second chance there are many doctors out there who have do worse and be punished less. Give him another chance. Smuggler
  • Score: 0

6:47pm Mon 31 Dec 12

Adam Walker says...

He shouldnt have been there in the first place. None of our people should. Just like they shouldnt be in Afghanistan and soon Iran. The people to blame for this mans plight is Tony Bliar and his WMD band of liars. By all accounts this man is a very good doctor. He should not be blamed because Blair told a pack of lies. We need more people like him, not less. Get him back to work ASAP. His people need him!
He shouldnt have been there in the first place. None of our people should. Just like they shouldnt be in Afghanistan and soon Iran. The people to blame for this mans plight is Tony Bliar and his WMD band of liars. By all accounts this man is a very good doctor. He should not be blamed because Blair told a pack of lies. We need more people like him, not less. Get him back to work ASAP. His people need him! Adam Walker
  • Score: 0

9:12pm Mon 31 Dec 12

Homshaw1 says...

Smuggler wrote:
I agree ,this newly qualified doctor was in a war zone and "not experienced " in handling the situation and yes it probably made the mistake in the tension of battle and misguided loyalty.the you man dies a second chance there are many doctors out there who have do worse and be punished less. Give him another chance.
You are right the Medical Council don't strike people off lightly and they had the facts. Don't give him another chance
[quote][p][bold]Smuggler[/bold] wrote: I agree ,this newly qualified doctor was in a war zone and "not experienced " in handling the situation and yes it probably made the mistake in the tension of battle and misguided loyalty.the you man dies a second chance there are many doctors out there who have do worse and be punished less. Give him another chance.[/p][/quote]You are right the Medical Council don't strike people off lightly and they had the facts. Don't give him another chance Homshaw1
  • Score: 0

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