Deprivation one of the biggest factors for lower life expectation in parts of Darlington, new figures show

TOWN HALL: Members of Darlington Borough Council's scrutiny committee discussed deprivation in the town

TOWN HALL: Members of Darlington Borough Council's scrutiny committee discussed deprivation in the town

First published in News The Northern Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Darlington reporter

HIGH levels of deprivation in parts of Darlington continue to be a cause for concern as new statistics show a large gap in the death rates between people living in different areas of the town.

Men living in poorer parts of the town have a life expectancy age 12.4 years lower than those living in more wealthy areas, with a gap of 8.1 years for women.

Annual figures from Public Health England show that although life expectancy for men and women across Darlington is improving compared to the national average, the gap between different areas of the town itself is narrowing much more slowly.

In a presentation to members of Darlington Borough Council’s health scrutiny committee, Miriam Davidson, the council’s assistant director for public health, told members that deprivation continues to be a key indicator in someone’s life expectancy.

She said there were “enduring problems” in some areas where Darlington fares significantly worse than the national average including long term unemployment, women who smoke during pregnancy, the number of girls under 18 who fall pregnant and the number of hospital stays for self-harm and alcohol abuse.

Some 21 per cent of children in the town are said to be living in deprivation.

The borough shows more positive results, above the national average, for low levels of violent crime, strong GCSE results, lower levels of sexually transmitted infections and low numbers of people killed or seriously injured on the roads.

Committee chairwoman Councillor Wendy Newall said: “It’s quite worrying that the same issues come up time and time again.

“Some of these issues are things that we’ve looked at previously in scrutiny such as obesity causing further health issues and harm from alcohol.”

Councillor Jan Taylor added: “The greatest difference between different parts of the town is deprivation. We need to work on that – the levels of deprivation in somewhere like Central Ward is clear to see.”

Ms Davidson said: “We want to look at some of the results and dig a bit deeper and find out more about what’s happening to cause those figures.

“There are massive pockets of deprivation – Darlington is so mixed. Partnership working is strong in Darlington but these are enduring and complex problems.

“The council, the NHS and voluntary groups can’t solve them alone, it’s about what we can do together. What we have done before is working to an extent but we need to try different things too.”

Comments (22)

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4:34pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Gamechanger says...

One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV.
One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV. Gamechanger
  • Score: 66

4:47pm Tue 2 Sep 14

cromwell1599 says...

You missed drugs.
You missed drugs. cromwell1599
  • Score: 26

5:32pm Tue 2 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.
i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder. LUSTARD
  • Score: -3

5:37pm Tue 2 Sep 14

RichToryTwats says...

Gamechanger wrote:
One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV.
Do you think it will really make a difference, the governmant doesn't matter who is in charge will always make excuses.
For now its the welfare state, in the future it will be immigrants they just want their pound of flesh off the UK public to keep them in a healthy lifestyle.
I have worked all my life and I don't get any luxuries, whether is the welfare or not the government will still take your tax off you and you wont pay any less it will still go up.
They are cutting the services in Darlington are we getting a tax cut or the council tax going down no way so I'm not bothered if people get welfare money off my tax money at least the government isn't getting it and that's good enough for me.
[quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV.[/p][/quote]Do you think it will really make a difference, the governmant doesn't matter who is in charge will always make excuses. For now its the welfare state, in the future it will be immigrants they just want their pound of flesh off the UK public to keep them in a healthy lifestyle. I have worked all my life and I don't get any luxuries, whether is the welfare or not the government will still take your tax off you and you wont pay any less it will still go up. They are cutting the services in Darlington are we getting a tax cut or the council tax going down no way so I'm not bothered if people get welfare money off my tax money at least the government isn't getting it and that's good enough for me. RichToryTwats
  • Score: -24

5:44pm Tue 2 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Gamechanger wrote:
One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV.
all fine and dandy except the engineers place was taken out to aycliffe when it could have been in darlington, our elected reresentative cindi hughes let it go apparently
[quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: One of the keys to reducing deprivation is a good education. This is a foundation of self respect and self support. Darlington offers excellent education which bodes well for our children's future. The answer I'm afraid is not to throw more money at the problem but to encourage people to be less reliant on the welfare state, in other words look for a job and don't have more kids than you - not the state - can afford to bring up. People know that alcohol, smoking and junk food don't go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle - they just choose to ignore it. There is a need to differentiate between genuine deprivation and deprivation by choice because the priority is the mobile phone, the booze, the fags and the Sky TV.[/p][/quote]all fine and dandy except the engineers place was taken out to aycliffe when it could have been in darlington, our elected reresentative cindi hughes let it go apparently LUSTARD
  • Score: 11

5:54pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Gamechanger says...

LUSTARD wrote:
i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.
I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families.
[quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.[/p][/quote]I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families. Gamechanger
  • Score: 24

6:45pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Counterview says...

This picture is reflected right across the UK. Deprivation, like privilege, will always be present as both are relative rather than absolute descriptions. It is for government to address the ongoing issues of poverty and deprivation. But, on average, the better off will inevitably tend to live longer than those in more straitened circumstances.
This picture is reflected right across the UK. Deprivation, like privilege, will always be present as both are relative rather than absolute descriptions. It is for government to address the ongoing issues of poverty and deprivation. But, on average, the better off will inevitably tend to live longer than those in more straitened circumstances. Counterview
  • Score: 17

8:18pm Tue 2 Sep 14

gramps427 says...

Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle.
Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle. gramps427
  • Score: 13

10:09pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Awake-in-Darlo says...

gramps427 wrote:
Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle.
One cannot help wondering what real insight these people have into the subject. Deprivation covers financial, educational, and more. They are in another world. A "good education" doesn`t guarantee a job, degrees ten a penny but cost a pretty penny in shape of student debt.
Peter Robinson the education expert/political speaker has a lot to say on
how the way schools and universities "prepare" kids for a world that does not exist any more. Pushed to pass exams but creativity not encouraged. Result, disillusionment when no jobs, no idea how to be inventive in many cases, temptation of drink and drugs, no choice but to claim benefits and lose enthusiasm even more. All day pubs and telly what else to do? Seems to be todays culture everywhere. Having said that, there`s far worse places than Darlington to live. Agree definitely need a change in policy from the top. Don`t hold your breath.. sadly.
[quote][p][bold]gramps427[/bold] wrote: Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle.[/p][/quote]One cannot help wondering what real insight these people have into the subject. Deprivation covers financial, educational, and more. They are in another world. A "good education" doesn`t guarantee a job, degrees ten a penny but cost a pretty penny in shape of student debt. Peter Robinson the education expert/political speaker has a lot to say on how the way schools and universities "prepare" kids for a world that does not exist any more. Pushed to pass exams but creativity not encouraged. Result, disillusionment when no jobs, no idea how to be inventive in many cases, temptation of drink and drugs, no choice but to claim benefits and lose enthusiasm even more. All day pubs and telly what else to do? Seems to be todays culture everywhere. Having said that, there`s far worse places than Darlington to live. Agree definitely need a change in policy from the top. Don`t hold your breath.. sadly. Awake-in-Darlo
  • Score: 12

10:51pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Gamechanger says...

A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.
A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits. Gamechanger
  • Score: 21

3:02am Wed 3 Sep 14

SirLance says...

Gamechanger wrote:
A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.
I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ?
[quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.[/p][/quote]I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ? SirLance
  • Score: 19

7:50am Wed 3 Sep 14

Homshaw1 says...

A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.
A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult. Homshaw1
  • Score: 16

9:31am Wed 3 Sep 14

jewitt says...

SirLance wrote:
Gamechanger wrote:
A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.
I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ?
As a defence of global capitalism fine. As a solution to regional growth not very convincing. If everybody decided to do what you did these opportunities would soon dry up. "Enjoying a lifestyle" without a national health system No thanks. Great if you are young but not much good later in life.
[quote][p][bold]SirLance[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.[/p][/quote]I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ?[/p][/quote]As a defence of global capitalism fine. As a solution to regional growth not very convincing. If everybody decided to do what you did these opportunities would soon dry up. "Enjoying a lifestyle" without a national health system No thanks. Great if you are young but not much good later in life. jewitt
  • Score: 4

10:55am Wed 3 Sep 14

SirLance says...

jewitt wrote:
SirLance wrote:
Gamechanger wrote:
A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.
I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ?
As a defence of global capitalism fine. As a solution to regional growth not very convincing. If everybody decided to do what you did these opportunities would soon dry up. "Enjoying a lifestyle" without a national health system No thanks. Great if you are young but not much good later in life.
Jewitt; I appreciate your point regarding supporting regional growth but is the region in sync with global change which is constant ? However I am not convinced your national health system is the answer! By being able to buy a 'sound policy' I can get things 'sorted out' promptly! No waiting list involved! Local hospitals luckily are really good, both my kids born locally 'first class' as per the health policies I was able to invest in many years ago! I would have struggled to attain similar if i had stayed local! In fact i just wouldn't have been able to afford it ! Thanks for our comment!
[quote][p][bold]jewitt[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SirLance[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: A good education is not just confined to degrees. It's also apprenticeships, technical and vocational studies. The common threads are motivation and a willingness to learn and better yourself. It's all too easy for some to give up on any hope of a decent future if they can survive on benefits.[/p][/quote]I got 'away' from Darlington some 30 years ago and would never return to live there! I was educated in London and trained as an apprentice in engineering with a first class Darlington company! Unfortunately the world changes and Darlington 'lost' some really great engineering companies! it's no use sitting waiting for someone to 'bring them back' it won't happen! You have to go out and look for opportunities! There's plenty of 'older' ex Darlington lads and their families living overseas enjoying a lifestyle that you couldn't find in Darlington! They apply their skills combined with experience to a ready market! By the way, no welfare is available in most of these countries! You have to provide your own medical insurance! Gt away from your 'comfort zone' and apply yourself to succeeding! Last weekend I read that there was a fully equipped medical service helicopter landing in Darlington because a woman fell and bumped her head at the shops ! The town is full of taxi's sitting idle, the Memorial hospital is less than 15 minutes from where the poor lady fell! How much was that call out?? This is exactly what has gone wrong with society in general in the UK -- a 'nanny state' were everyone expects free handouts! Well I'm afraid it just doesn't happen so now the 'deprivation card is played' -Who is deprived and of what are they deprived of ?[/p][/quote]As a defence of global capitalism fine. As a solution to regional growth not very convincing. If everybody decided to do what you did these opportunities would soon dry up. "Enjoying a lifestyle" without a national health system No thanks. Great if you are young but not much good later in life.[/p][/quote]Jewitt; I appreciate your point regarding supporting regional growth but is the region in sync with global change which is constant ? However I am not convinced your national health system is the answer! By being able to buy a 'sound policy' I can get things 'sorted out' promptly! No waiting list involved! Local hospitals luckily are really good, both my kids born locally 'first class' as per the health policies I was able to invest in many years ago! I would have struggled to attain similar if i had stayed local! In fact i just wouldn't have been able to afford it ! Thanks for our comment! SirLance
  • Score: 1

12:27pm Wed 3 Sep 14

laboursfoe says...

Homshaw1 wrote:
A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.
14 yeasr ago I was working at Orange, earning £11,000 a year with little prospect of significant pay increase or opportunity to progress. I was living in the Denes in a rented house I disliked with disgusting neighbours.

I saw a job advertised for £12,000 30 miles away and took it. I had to pay my own travel and therefore I was about the same money wise as when I worked at the previous place on the lower salary and traveling for 2+ hours a day.

What that job did give me was experience and an opportunity to progress if I was motivated enough to want to. I am now where I want to be in life, I have a nice house in the west end and am on a good salary. All of this was through hard work, sacrifice a pushing my self to succeed. I did it all off my own back, with no assistance from 'partnerships' etc.

I had no qualifications to speak of, just a determination that the quality and standard of life that I had was not what I wanted.

The question is if I had taken the easy route and stayed at Orange and living where I was, would I be classed as living in deprivation?? Personally I see it that I would have deprived myself.....
[quote][p][bold]Homshaw1[/bold] wrote: A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.[/p][/quote]14 yeasr ago I was working at Orange, earning £11,000 a year with little prospect of significant pay increase or opportunity to progress. I was living in the Denes in a rented house I disliked with disgusting neighbours. I saw a job advertised for £12,000 30 miles away and took it. I had to pay my own travel and therefore I was about the same money wise as when I worked at the previous place on the lower salary and traveling for 2+ hours a day. What that job did give me was experience and an opportunity to progress if I was motivated enough to want to. I am now where I want to be in life, I have a nice house in the west end and am on a good salary. All of this was through hard work, sacrifice a pushing my self to succeed. I did it all off my own back, with no assistance from 'partnerships' etc. I had no qualifications to speak of, just a determination that the quality and standard of life that I had was not what I wanted. The question is if I had taken the easy route and stayed at Orange and living where I was, would I be classed as living in deprivation?? Personally I see it that I would have deprived myself..... laboursfoe
  • Score: 20

6:44pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Red rose lad says...

There are many companies out there who are unable to recruit candidates with the correct skill set. Part of the reason for that is the disconnect between educational establishments and industry. These extablishments will continue to educate people in subjects where they know there is no demand just for the cash. Candidates themselves have to accept responsibility for their future when choosing training courses and career paths by carrying out some research into what gaps are available in their chosen discipline. By all means train to be a Unicorn Farrier if that is your hearts desire; but be aware that your prospects will be as bright as a trophy polisher at Newcastle United FC.
There are many companies out there who are unable to recruit candidates with the correct skill set. Part of the reason for that is the disconnect between educational establishments and industry. These extablishments will continue to educate people in subjects where they know there is no demand just for the cash. Candidates themselves have to accept responsibility for their future when choosing training courses and career paths by carrying out some research into what gaps are available in their chosen discipline. By all means train to be a Unicorn Farrier if that is your hearts desire; but be aware that your prospects will be as bright as a trophy polisher at Newcastle United FC. Red rose lad
  • Score: 6

9:52pm Wed 3 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Gamechanger wrote:
LUSTARD wrote:
i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.
I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families.
yes of course theirs an obligation to get a job .im asking how many jobs their are available to the 100,000 population of darlington
[quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.[/p][/quote]I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families.[/p][/quote]yes of course theirs an obligation to get a job .im asking how many jobs their are available to the 100,000 population of darlington LUSTARD
  • Score: 3

9:58pm Wed 3 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Gamechanger wrote:
LUSTARD wrote:
i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.
I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families.
also i know everyone who lives in the town doesnt works in the town,,,,,,,, but ,,,, have you seen the queue getting into town down north rd and auckland rd never mind haughton rd and yarm rd to work on a morning, its **** easy to drive out put it that way
[quote][p][bold]Gamechanger[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: i wonder in darlington with 100,000 population, how many jobs their are to afford a mortgage in the west end,, i wonder how many jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage on mowden, iwonder howmany jobs are avilable to afford a mortgage in the denes, same for affording mortgage to buy a council house, i wonder where you could get those figures, do you think our politician should have this info to hand,, i wonder.[/p][/quote]I doubt they have the figures and not everyone who lives in the town works in the town. Our leaders have an obligation to attract jobs to the town - decent high quality jobs and jobs that suit those who are less academic - but there is an equal obligation on individuals to get a job and provide for themselves and their families.[/p][/quote]also i know everyone who lives in the town doesnt works in the town,,,,,,,, but ,,,, have you seen the queue getting into town down north rd and auckland rd never mind haughton rd and yarm rd to work on a morning, its **** easy to drive out put it that way LUSTARD
  • Score: 2

10:02pm Wed 3 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Counterview wrote:
This picture is reflected right across the UK. Deprivation, like privilege, will always be present as both are relative rather than absolute descriptions. It is for government to address the ongoing issues of poverty and deprivation. But, on average, the better off will inevitably tend to live longer than those in more straitened circumstances.
dear me. lets go and take it off them the same, same way they got it in the first place
[quote][p][bold]Counterview[/bold] wrote: This picture is reflected right across the UK. Deprivation, like privilege, will always be present as both are relative rather than absolute descriptions. It is for government to address the ongoing issues of poverty and deprivation. But, on average, the better off will inevitably tend to live longer than those in more straitened circumstances.[/p][/quote]dear me. lets go and take it off them the same, same way they got it in the first place LUSTARD
  • Score: 0

10:19pm Wed 3 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Awake-in-Darlo wrote:
gramps427 wrote:
Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle.
One cannot help wondering what real insight these people have into the subject. Deprivation covers financial, educational, and more. They are in another world. A "good education" doesn`t guarantee a job, degrees ten a penny but cost a pretty penny in shape of student debt.
Peter Robinson the education expert/political speaker has a lot to say on
how the way schools and universities "prepare" kids for a world that does not exist any more. Pushed to pass exams but creativity not encouraged. Result, disillusionment when no jobs, no idea how to be inventive in many cases, temptation of drink and drugs, no choice but to claim benefits and lose enthusiasm even more. All day pubs and telly what else to do? Seems to be todays culture everywhere. Having said that, there`s far worse places than Darlington to live. Agree definitely need a change in policy from the top. Don`t hold your breath.. sadly.
oh deary deary me, are you free, think about it , start walking , anywhere any direction, 20 mile you will be tired , what to do, stop, stay for the night till your refreshed ..... can you. if you can round that simple problem you wont need a degree, do you agree, but to be reliant on a 50 quid hand out from the public is the big death knell
[quote][p][bold]Awake-in-Darlo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gramps427[/bold] wrote: Many of the problems are historical in nature; areas that once served a certain type of work which has disappeared over the last 50 years or so, for example. A good education is vital in today's cut throat world; but how many people holding a degree are out of work or taking a wage in a job that could easily be done by someone who can read, write and do basic maths! What is needed to help people get out of that sort of rut are trained professionals who can encourage and bring the best out of people who failed at school for whatever reason; that takes long term funding and consistency of policy, something no Government past or present can claim title to. Then of course they need decent jobs which pay a salary that does not need benefits added to it for people to afford to live a decent lifestyle.[/p][/quote]One cannot help wondering what real insight these people have into the subject. Deprivation covers financial, educational, and more. They are in another world. A "good education" doesn`t guarantee a job, degrees ten a penny but cost a pretty penny in shape of student debt. Peter Robinson the education expert/political speaker has a lot to say on how the way schools and universities "prepare" kids for a world that does not exist any more. Pushed to pass exams but creativity not encouraged. Result, disillusionment when no jobs, no idea how to be inventive in many cases, temptation of drink and drugs, no choice but to claim benefits and lose enthusiasm even more. All day pubs and telly what else to do? Seems to be todays culture everywhere. Having said that, there`s far worse places than Darlington to live. Agree definitely need a change in policy from the top. Don`t hold your breath.. sadly.[/p][/quote]oh deary deary me, are you free, think about it , start walking , anywhere any direction, 20 mile you will be tired , what to do, stop, stay for the night till your refreshed ..... can you. if you can round that simple problem you wont need a degree, do you agree, but to be reliant on a 50 quid hand out from the public is the big death knell LUSTARD
  • Score: 3

10:34pm Wed 3 Sep 14

LUSTARD says...

Homshaw1 wrote:
A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.
very well put
[quote][p][bold]Homshaw1[/bold] wrote: A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.[/p][/quote]very well put LUSTARD
  • Score: 3

7:21am Thu 4 Sep 14

SirLance says...

LUSTARD wrote:
Homshaw1 wrote:
A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.
very well put
Very well put! love it! Thanks also to the 'nanny state'!
[quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Homshaw1[/bold] wrote: A cycle of hard working, skilled workers who gave their children the same values has been broken. Changing it will be difficult.[/p][/quote]very well put[/p][/quote]Very well put! love it! Thanks also to the 'nanny state'! SirLance
  • Score: 0
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