Health and safety 'knit-wits' order Tour de France bunting to be taken down

The Northern Echo: TRADERS' DISMAY: Shop assistant, Elise Clayton with some of the knitted Tour de France bunting which had to be taken down from lampposts in Masham for health and safety reasons. Picture: RICHARD DOUGHTY TRADERS' DISMAY: Shop assistant, Elise Clayton with some of the knitted Tour de France bunting which had to be taken down from lampposts in Masham for health and safety reasons. Picture: RICHARD DOUGHTY

HEALTH and safety bosses have ordered knitted bunting in a town on the Tour de France route to be taken down – as it was causing lampposts to lean.

The bunting, featuring yellow, green, white and polka dot jumpers to represent the winners’ jerseys in the race, had been hung in Masham, near Ripon, by Harrogate Borough Council following an appeal by the authority to decorate the district.

Over six months, hundreds of schoolchildren, women’s institutes, craft groups and knitters from as far afield as Australia and the Arctic Circle created 23,453 jumpers for the display.

A month after the bunting was hung in the town’s Market Place, and less than three weeks before 20,000 visitors are expected to visit Masham to see the race, residents and traders were stunned to see hundreds of the knitted jumpers being taken down by tree surgeons.

North Yorkshire County Council, which owns the lampposts, said it had asked the borough council to remove the bunting on safety grounds.

It is believed the weight of the bunting increased after rain, causing lampposts to lean.

Owner of Market Place sweet shop Bah Humbugs Lucy Scott Paul said: “I couldn’t believe it, I found it absolutely absurd that the council could send out their tree surgeons.”

Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “It’s health and safety gone crazy. Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?”

A borough council spokesman said an inspection of the lampposts had revealed damage to the base of one of them and called for ideas where the bunting could be displayed.

He said: “We are now looking to see what options are available to have them re-fixed in Masham, so that residents can actively support the imminent arrival of the Tour de France.”

A county council spokesman said: "Following Harrogate Borough Council’s erection of bunting in Masham we noticed that the lighting columns were leaning and in the interest of safety we asked the council to take them down as a matter of some urgency.

"We welcome bunting on buildings, or between trees, but it cannot be hung between lampposts for the safety reasons."

Mrs Klemz said aghast traders and residents salvaged the bunting and had hung it outside their shops and homes to ensure the volunteers’ work would still be seen, but that it was not as visible as it had been.

Masham Parish Council chairman and bed and breakfast owner Councillor Andrew Burrell said he was disappointed the bunting had been moved, but accepted it had been based on health and safety advice.

He said: “It still has the makings of being a very successful weekend with Masham being presented to a wider world.”

*Send us pictures of the celebrations as the Tour passes through your town or village. Text NORTHERN ECHO to 80360, email newsdesk@nne.co.uk or tweet us using the hashtag #echotdf

Comments (28)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:33pm Thu 19 Jun 14

andrew flower says...

If knitting causes a lamppost to lean over it must be a pathetic one. Only surprise it's not in Alexander land
If knitting causes a lamppost to lean over it must be a pathetic one. Only surprise it's not in Alexander land andrew flower
  • Score: 36

5:44pm Thu 19 Jun 14

eeoodares says...

“It’s health and safety gone crazy. Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?" What a remarkable statement, with logical thinking like that you should get a job with Alexander and his circus.
“It’s health and safety gone crazy. Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?" What a remarkable statement, with logical thinking like that you should get a job with Alexander and his circus. eeoodares
  • Score: 34

5:54pm Thu 19 Jun 14

snickelwaysofyork says...

One can only wonder at which council jobsworth had the time to go round Masham studying bunting on lampposts before arriving at the surprising and frankly mystifying conclusion that little pieces of knitting strung between numerous lampposts could cause a lamppost to lean. Ridiculous.
One can only wonder at which council jobsworth had the time to go round Masham studying bunting on lampposts before arriving at the surprising and frankly mystifying conclusion that little pieces of knitting strung between numerous lampposts could cause a lamppost to lean. Ridiculous. snickelwaysofyork
  • Score: 30

6:49pm Thu 19 Jun 14

thecairnman says...

is not a case of the lamppost base not secure and nothing to do with the bunting its more of a case of the lampposts that need to come down before they fall over and hurt some one
is not a case of the lamppost base not secure and nothing to do with the bunting its more of a case of the lampposts that need to come down before they fall over and hurt some one thecairnman
  • Score: 32

6:53pm Thu 19 Jun 14

Dave Ruddock says...

Just wondered if the council at Marsham will be removing, replacing the lamp posts, as if someone leans against one or vehicle hits one ???


Rain (1) Lamp Post (0)
Just wondered if the council at Marsham will be removing, replacing the lamp posts, as if someone leans against one or vehicle hits one ??? Rain (1) Lamp Post (0) Dave Ruddock
  • Score: 25

7:23pm Thu 19 Jun 14

bill bailey says...

MA\RSHAM go into the road and have a sit down in protest, the stupidity is beyond belief, only idiots could think up this one ,,throw tacks over the road stop the race has been mooted. its been said ,
MA\RSHAM go into the road and have a sit down in protest, the stupidity is beyond belief, only idiots could think up this one ,,throw tacks over the road stop the race has been mooted. its been said , bill bailey
  • Score: -12

7:28pm Thu 19 Jun 14

pedalling paul says...

If lots of people take a cue from the George Formby song and lean on the lamposts, would that straighten them back up......?
If lots of people take a cue from the George Formby song and lean on the lamposts, would that straighten them back up......? pedalling paul
  • Score: 7

8:28pm Thu 19 Jun 14

piaggio1 says...

Spokesman?????
Whats his /her name..why do these un-elected
Officials hide behind a badge....who are they.
Spokesman????? Whats his /her name..why do these un-elected Officials hide behind a badge....who are they. piaggio1
  • Score: 13

10:11pm Thu 19 Jun 14

spragger says...

Local Council finds useful role ..

The Council curse of 'elf & safety strikes again.
That is why no one takes any notice of them
Crying wolf once too often
Local Council finds useful role .. The Council curse of 'elf & safety strikes again. That is why no one takes any notice of them Crying wolf once too often spragger
  • Score: 2

1:44am Fri 20 Jun 14

Magicman! says...

Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'.

If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian.

And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France??

Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?”
There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.
Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France?? [quote]Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?” [/quote]There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year. Magicman!
  • Score: 19

6:18am Fri 20 Jun 14

darloboss says...

agreed magicman!
yorkshire born and yorkshire bred
thick of arm and thick of head
agreed magicman! yorkshire born and yorkshire bred thick of arm and thick of head darloboss
  • Score: -5

7:12am Fri 20 Jun 14

postie28 says...

Dave Ruddock wrote:
Just wondered if the council at Marsham will be removing, replacing the lamp posts, as if someone leans against one or vehicle hits one ???


Rain (1) Lamp Post (0)
or if a big dog pee's very hard on one ??
[quote][p][bold]Dave Ruddock[/bold] wrote: Just wondered if the council at Marsham will be removing, replacing the lamp posts, as if someone leans against one or vehicle hits one ??? Rain (1) Lamp Post (0)[/p][/quote]or if a big dog pee's very hard on one ?? postie28
  • Score: 3

9:21am Fri 20 Jun 14

shartin says...

I wonder what kind of wool they used?
I wonder what kind of wool they used? shartin
  • Score: 5

9:24am Fri 20 Jun 14

Firedrake says...

Wet fabric can be remarkably heavy and dense. I am told that a wet blanket slung over a clothesline can sometimes stop a bullet!
Wet fabric can be remarkably heavy and dense. I am told that a wet blanket slung over a clothesline can sometimes stop a bullet! Firedrake
  • Score: 2

9:33am Fri 20 Jun 14

SpinningJenny says...

This isn't really that surprising. The comment about the sheep not falling over when it's wet is ridiculous - the vast majority of cheap yarn these days is made from acrylic material with very little natural fibre like wool. It soaks up a lot of water very quickly and doesn't drain easily, so it's obvious that it would gain a lot of weight from a few rain showers and this could cause a lamp post to lean. Yarn-bombing like this is a cute idea in theory but in practical terms it often creates a huge environmentally-dama
ging mess.
This isn't really that surprising. The comment about the sheep not falling over when it's wet is ridiculous - the vast majority of cheap yarn these days is made from acrylic material with very little natural fibre like wool. It soaks up a lot of water very quickly and doesn't drain easily, so it's obvious that it would gain a lot of weight from a few rain showers and this could cause a lamp post to lean. Yarn-bombing like this is a cute idea in theory but in practical terms it often creates a huge environmentally-dama ging mess. SpinningJenny
  • Score: 4

10:11am Fri 20 Jun 14

studio says...

Magicman! wrote:
Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France??
Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?”
There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.
Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE?

You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket.

This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over.
[quote][p][bold]Magicman![/bold] wrote: Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France?? [quote]Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?” [/quote]There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.[/p][/quote]Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE? You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket. This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over. studio
  • Score: -1

11:10am Fri 20 Jun 14

again says...

piaggio1 wrote:
Spokesman?????
Whats his /her name..why do these un-elected
Officials hide behind a badge....who are they.
Presumably it's in case some nutter stalks them. Try working on a complaints line, there's always some dissatisfied customer wants to know where you live!
[quote][p][bold]piaggio1[/bold] wrote: Spokesman????? Whats his /her name..why do these un-elected Officials hide behind a badge....who are they.[/p][/quote]Presumably it's in case some nutter stalks them. Try working on a complaints line, there's always some dissatisfied customer wants to know where you live! again
  • Score: 5

11:11am Fri 20 Jun 14

LUSTARD says...

snickelwaysofyork wrote:
One can only wonder at which council jobsworth had the time to go round Masham studying bunting on lampposts before arriving at the surprising and frankly mystifying conclusion that little pieces of knitting strung between numerous lampposts could cause a lamppost to lean. Ridiculous.
the one that potencially saved a life, dog **** sorry urine causes the base of the metal/concrete posts to weaken, heavy rain even light rain quadruples the weight of garmments, to make it really easy for you put your jumper under the tap and wheigh it, thus lots of extra weight can cause a collapse of a post
[quote][p][bold]snickelwaysofyork[/bold] wrote: One can only wonder at which council jobsworth had the time to go round Masham studying bunting on lampposts before arriving at the surprising and frankly mystifying conclusion that little pieces of knitting strung between numerous lampposts could cause a lamppost to lean. Ridiculous.[/p][/quote]the one that potencially saved a life, dog **** sorry urine causes the base of the metal/concrete posts to weaken, heavy rain even light rain quadruples the weight of garmments, to make it really easy for you put your jumper under the tap and wheigh it, thus lots of extra weight can cause a collapse of a post LUSTARD
  • Score: -7

11:15am Fri 20 Jun 14

LUSTARD says...

studio wrote:
Magicman! wrote:
Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France??
Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?”
There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.
Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE?

You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket.

This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over.
oh yes they can
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Magicman![/bold] wrote: Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France?? [quote]Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?” [/quote]There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.[/p][/quote]Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE? You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket. This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over.[/p][/quote]oh yes they can LUSTARD
  • Score: -4

11:51am Fri 20 Jun 14

studio says...

LUSTARD wrote:
studio wrote:
Magicman! wrote: Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France??
Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?”
There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.
Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE? You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket. This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over.
oh yes they can
They wouldnt.Its a lamp post not a garden cane. I`m sure the cord they were suspended with would have given way before the lamp post.
[quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Magicman![/bold] wrote: Unless you know the actual physics behind this, then this might seem a bit odd... But here's the simple fact, those lamp posts are only made from a thin steel alloy; then there is a fancy bracket attached than then holds a lantern; the lantern itself holds a heavy weight metal ballast which pwoeres the lamp inside... all of this extra metal not only adds weight as a 'headload' but is also extra area which the wind can blow against, known as 'wind area'. If you go down Layerthorpe and look at the lamp post outside the little Asda on a windy day, you will see the lantern and bracket bouncing up and down in the wind - this is because the wind is buffeting the lantern itself and pushing it upwards, then the weight of the heavy metal control equipment inside pulls the lantern back down, resulting in bouncing... this oscillation weakens the metal, which causes fatigue and will then lead to cracking in the material. And because the metal is ferrous, once it cracks this then allows moisture to enter the crack and further errode at the metal, which spreads the crack further until the point of failure - at which point a half-ton piece of metal then comes crashing down onto a car, cyclist, or pedestrian. And if you don't believe what damage weather can do to tall structures, I'd suggest you read information about the ORIGINAL TV mast at Emley Moor - it used to be a metal structure held up by tensioned wires, but the weight of ice on the wires caused them to snap and the weight of ice on the wires that had not snapped then pulled over the entire television mast. Wet wooly jumpers hanging from a lamp post would do the same thing if there was a violent storm or two just like we had this winter. It's all well and good shouting "elf n safety madness", but what would you all be saying if one of these lamp posts then fell onto spectators on the day of the Tour de France?? [quote]Tessa Klemz, manager of Masham Community Office, said: “.... Sheep do not fall over when they get wet, so why should lampposts?” [/quote]There are some pretty dumb people and stupid statements out there, but this by far takes the number 1 slot for this year.[/p][/quote]Excellent info councillor magicman. I`m assuming you work for HSE? You need to get out more, and i dont mean observing lamp posts by your local supermarket. This i ridiculous, I saw this bunting last week. regardless of the flimsy metal lamp posts are made of, or the amount of rain to fall on the bunting. They are not going to fall over.[/p][/quote]oh yes they can[/p][/quote]They wouldnt.Its a lamp post not a garden cane. I`m sure the cord they were suspended with would have given way before the lamp post. studio
  • Score: 4

1:03pm Fri 20 Jun 14

Blimp says...

Hey Magicman....

Brilliant, love it! More please.
Hey Magicman.... Brilliant, love it! More please. Blimp
  • Score: 2

2:37pm Fri 20 Jun 14

eboricana says...

Personally i prefer to call them Health and Safety Taliban because frankly that is what they are becoming - some ideas are bonkers and some are making this country a complete laughing stock!
Personally i prefer to call them Health and Safety Taliban because frankly that is what they are becoming - some ideas are bonkers and some are making this country a complete laughing stock! eboricana
  • Score: 12

2:59pm Fri 20 Jun 14

nigel d says...

What about the lamp on the top of the post, is that not heavy.
who ever came to this decision wants dismissing immediately.
that will save the council a fair bit as I imagine he'll be on a large salary.
What about the lamp on the top of the post, is that not heavy. who ever came to this decision wants dismissing immediately. that will save the council a fair bit as I imagine he'll be on a large salary. nigel d
  • Score: 1

6:44pm Fri 20 Jun 14

spragger says...

As usual the amateur 'elf & safety folk have gone overboard again and sucked in a lot more as well

The consequences of a streetlight falling would be quite large but as the more perceptive of you have recognised the likelihood of that is almost zero.
But these numptys try & protect against zero liklihoods
As usual the amateur 'elf & safety folk have gone overboard again and sucked in a lot more as well The consequences of a streetlight falling would be quite large but as the more perceptive of you have recognised the likelihood of that is almost zero. But these numptys try & protect against zero liklihoods spragger
  • Score: 0

11:13am Sat 21 Jun 14

LUSTARD says...

julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in.
julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in. LUSTARD
  • Score: 6

4:30pm Sat 21 Jun 14

durhamchap says...

Council sat the wool bunting is dangerous but a lot of people have posted comments saying it isn't and it is the usual elf & safety brigade rubbish we all know and laugh at.
Well how about if the council have the lampposts with bunting attached tested by some independent expert.If the bunting is dangerous then the council were right but if the bunting does not cause the lamps to collapse then maybe the council could pay to have all the bunting replaced !
Council sat the wool bunting is dangerous but a lot of people have posted comments saying it isn't and it is the usual elf & safety brigade rubbish we all know and laugh at. Well how about if the council have the lampposts with bunting attached tested by some independent expert.If the bunting is dangerous then the council were right but if the bunting does not cause the lamps to collapse then maybe the council could pay to have all the bunting replaced ! durhamchap
  • Score: 0

2:35pm Tue 24 Jun 14

studio says...

LUSTARD wrote:
julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in.
Bet she wishes she hung her Christmas bunting on someone elses lamp post!
[quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in.[/p][/quote]Bet she wishes she hung her Christmas bunting on someone elses lamp post! studio
  • Score: 0

9:17am Wed 25 Jun 14

LUSTARD says...

studio wrote:
LUSTARD wrote:
julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in.
Bet she wishes she hung her Christmas bunting on someone elses lamp post!
absolutely
[quote][p][bold]studio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LUSTARD[/bold] wrote: julie mcann of leyton buzzard is still waiting for compensation amounting to over 4000 pounds after an aluminium and concrete lamp post collapsed onto her car on christmas day she cant claim on her car insurance as it was parked on her drive and not being used on the highway. fortunatelly no one was killed but the vehicle very exstensively damaged, had this hit you it would have caved your skull in.[/p][/quote]Bet she wishes she hung her Christmas bunting on someone elses lamp post![/p][/quote]absolutely LUSTARD
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree