Father and son fall overboard as their empty fishing boat roars away

The Northern Echo: Redcar lifeboat alongside the fishing boat after the two men were rescued., Photo: Rob Marshall, Redcar lifeboat alongside the fishing boat after the two men were rescued., Photo: Rob Marshall,

A FATHER and son had lucky escapes when a freak engine accident threw them into the sea from their boat - which then roared off at top speed.

The pair were fishing some three miles off Redcar earlier today (June 14) when their outboard engine broke down.

As they tried to fix it, the engine restarted in gear and set to full speed - throwing both into the water.

The fishing boat then circled the two men - neither of whom were wearing lifejackets - for 40 minutes until it ran out of fuel.

The younger man, in his 20s, was then able to climb back into the boat and send out a Mayday distress call at around 12.30pm.

Meanwhile, his dad had been swept nearly a quarter of mile away from the boat by the tide.

The Redcar RNLI lifeboat was immediately launched but as it was heading to the scene, a nearby fishing boat Nimrod II, with RNLI volunteer Cameron Bond and his son Jordan on board, also responded.

Cameron found the man in the water about 300 yards away from his boat.

‘When we pulled the man from the sea he was shaking violently and he couldn’t speak," he said.

‘I knew from my RNLI training that I had to get the guy back to the beach as fast as I could so the crew from the lifeboat station could give him first aid.

When Cameron arrived back at the beach at Redcar, RNLI crew members were waiting to give the man first aid before carrying him to an ambulance.

Meanwhile, the Redcar lifeboat had reached the scene and found the son on board suffering from the effects of being in the sea.

He was taken on board the lifeboat and given first aid while the lifeboat made full-speed for the lifeboat station.

He was also taken to the ambulance where both men were treated by ambulance staff for hypothermia before being transferred to James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough.

The Redcar lifeboat then returned again to the scene to tow the fishing boat back to Redcar where lifeboat volunteers made the boat safe on its trailer.

A passing warship also responded to the request for assistance

Dave Cocks from Redcar RNLI said: ‘The two men have had an extremely lucky escape. There have been some tragic accidents involving boats when people are thrown into the sea and the boat’s engine keeps going.

‘It was extremely fortunate that one of our own lifeboat crew members was at sea fishing when the Mayday went out. He was quickly on scene to rescue the man from the water, otherwise it could have been tragic.

‘When the lifeboat got there they were able to give the other man the first aid he needed while he was being brought back to the beach at Redcar.

‘Both men really owe a lot to the RNLI’s training on this occasion.’

Comments (4)

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12:48am Sun 15 Jun 14

Longbowman666 says...

And neither of them were obviously wearing kill cords as they should have been, because if they had been as soon as they'd gone overboard the engine would have been automatically stopped.

Once again, another demonstration of why wearing them is important.
And neither of them were obviously wearing kill cords as they should have been, because if they had been as soon as they'd gone overboard the engine would have been automatically stopped. Once again, another demonstration of why wearing them is important. Longbowman666
  • Score: 0

1:37am Sun 15 Jun 14

Kaylz4eva says...

Yes and they have learnt from that as te engine was not fitted with one, but let's not be a clever clogs now... My father and brother had a lucky escape and are thankfully ok.., !! But noted before they even got home a kill cord is getting arranged for the engine before there next fishing trip..
Amazing how some people have to get there two pence worth without even the comment.. "Thank fully they where ok"

Arnt you a delightfully positive person..
Yes and they have learnt from that as te engine was not fitted with one, but let's not be a clever clogs now... My father and brother had a lucky escape and are thankfully ok.., !! But noted before they even got home a kill cord is getting arranged for the engine before there next fishing trip.. Amazing how some people have to get there two pence worth without even the comment.. "Thank fully they where ok" Arnt you a delightfully positive person.. Kaylz4eva
  • Score: 20

8:19am Sun 15 Jun 14

greenfinger says...

neither of whom were wearing lifejackets? Thats just silly, even if I do say so after the horse has bolted.
neither of whom were wearing lifejackets? Thats just silly, even if I do say so after the horse has bolted. greenfinger
  • Score: 4

6:33pm Sun 15 Jun 14

Longbowman666 says...

Kaylz4eva wrote:
Yes and they have learnt from that as te engine was not fitted with one, but let's not be a clever clogs now... My father and brother had a lucky escape and are thankfully ok.., !! But noted before they even got home a kill cord is getting arranged for the engine before there next fishing trip..
Amazing how some people have to get there two pence worth without even the comment.. "Thank fully they where ok"

Arnt you a delightfully positive person..
No, I work professionally at sea, teaching FRC (fast rescue craft) Coxswains and boatmen and this should have been part of the boat's safety gear before they went. You might recall that only last year there were two fatalities off Cornwall involving the lack of use of Kill Cords, and if you care to pick up a copy of any of the MAIB (Marine Accident Investigation Branch) quarterly summaries of reports you will see how many such cases there are, and how bad it can be.

Yes, thankfully they were okay, but perhaps you can appreciate how it makes folks like me feel who do this for a job when we see what could easily been a fatal accident, and all for the sake of a piece of stretchy plastic cord and some plastic end pieces? Not to be funny, but if you go to sea, whether for work or leisure, then do it properly - the sea is no respecter of those who do not.
[quote][p][bold]Kaylz4eva[/bold] wrote: Yes and they have learnt from that as te engine was not fitted with one, but let's not be a clever clogs now... My father and brother had a lucky escape and are thankfully ok.., !! But noted before they even got home a kill cord is getting arranged for the engine before there next fishing trip.. Amazing how some people have to get there two pence worth without even the comment.. "Thank fully they where ok" Arnt you a delightfully positive person..[/p][/quote]No, I work professionally at sea, teaching FRC (fast rescue craft) Coxswains and boatmen and this should have been part of the boat's safety gear before they went. You might recall that only last year there were two fatalities off Cornwall involving the lack of use of Kill Cords, and if you care to pick up a copy of any of the MAIB (Marine Accident Investigation Branch) quarterly summaries of reports you will see how many such cases there are, and how bad it can be. Yes, thankfully they were okay, but perhaps you can appreciate how it makes folks like me feel who do this for a job when we see what could easily been a fatal accident, and all for the sake of a piece of stretchy plastic cord and some plastic end pieces? Not to be funny, but if you go to sea, whether for work or leisure, then do it properly - the sea is no respecter of those who do not. Longbowman666
  • Score: 2

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