Votes to be counted in 'earthquake' poll

SCHOOL OF VOTING: Corporation Road Primary School in Darlington is used as a polling station for voters for the European elections. Picture: CHRIS BOOTH (6455600)

SCHOOL OF VOTING: Corporation Road Primary School in Darlington is used as a polling station for voters for the European elections. Picture: CHRIS BOOTH (6455602)

First published in News

VOTES are set to be counted in European and local elections which could signal a new era in British politics if the results produce the "earthquake" predicted by Nigel Farage and his UK Independence Party.

As with the rest of the UK, votes were cast throughout the North-East for the European Parliament contest. However, only three MEPs from a total of 73 will come from the region. Yorkshire and the Humber will elect six MEPs.

Meanwhile, more than 4,000 council seats at 161 English local authorities, including the London boroughs, and those in Northern Ireland are also up for election.

With a year to go until the general election, the stakes are high and all parties will be studying the results for indications about their prospects in 2015.

Counting took place in some local elections overnight, but the European declarations will not begin until Sunday - meaning a wait to see if Ukip's opinion poll lead translates into first place in the contest and a nervous few days for the Liberal Democrats who face the prospect of being wiped out.

Labour, the Conservatives and Lib Dems will study the results for clues as to whether Ukip is developing into an electoral force which could hold the balance of power at Westminster in 2015 - or if Mr Farage's bubble will burst and disillusioned voters can be tempted back after making a protest at the ballot box this year.

A victory for Ukip could present Prime Minister David Cameron with a challenging 12 months in Downing Street as he seeks to appeal to the nation and keep the Eurosceptic wing of the Conservative Party content on issues including immigration.

Official figures showed the Tory promise to reduce immigration to the "tens of thousands" by May 2015 is moving further out of reach as new data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed net migration increasing to 212,000 in the year to December, from 177,000 the previous year.

Labour has claimed a good night would yield an extra 200 councillors, although independent commentators have suggested Ed Miliband's party should be hoping for up to 500 gains.

The party has been pouring resources into seats they will be targeting in next year's general election.

A good night would see Labour claim a 25 per cent share in the European elections, giving Ed Miliband's party around 22 MEPs instead of the current 13.

A senior source appeared to concede that Ukip could top the polls and said: "We are now in an era of four-party politics, but what we have got to do, and what we hope we are starting to do, is win where it matters in the local elections."

Labour was "ruthlessly" targeting its efforts at battleground seats in next year's Westminster contest, inspired by US president Barack Obama's strategy - masterminded by Labour's new guru David Axelrod - of focusing resources where they would have the most impact.

"We know we are going to have less money than the Tories, so we have got to make better use of the money and people we have got, and to use that in the most sensible way," added the source.

The party hopes the strategy will pay dividends in areas including Redbridge, Croydon and Cambridge.

Labour strategists will also be hoping to see the Tories failing to hold seats in marginal wards in Basildon, Peterborough, Southend and Swindon - the authority where Mr Miliband failed to recognise the name of the party's senior councillor during a campaign radio interview.

The pro-EU Liberal Democrats have acknowledged they are facing a "difficult" night which could leave it with no representatives in the European Parliament.

The party is set for an electoral mauling in the council contests and is facing a fierce battle to avoid losing control of some of its local authorities, including Kingston-upon-Thames, which includes the Westminster seat of Cabinet minister Ed Davey.

A Lib Dem source has suggested the party's hopes rest on getting their vote out in the strongholds where they have Westminster MPs, so Kingston will be an indication of the success of that strategy.

Police were stationed at some polling stations in London, including in Tower Hamlets where the controversial mayor Lutfur Rahman is standing for re-election, and where the contest in one ward has been postponed due to the death of a candidate.

The electoral marathon will see some votes still being counted on Monday.

Counting of the European Parliament votes starts on Sunday, but no announcements can be made until 10pm under rules barring declarations until polls have closed all over the EU.

Final results in Scotland will not be available until Monday morning, because of opposition to Sunday working in Comhairle nan Eilean Siar - Western Isles.

But - at the same time - counting will be getting under way in Northern Ireland.

The Prime Minister said he was "proud" of the Conservative campaign "whatever the results".

In a message on Twitter, Mr Cameron said: "To all the Conservatives who campaigned these past few weeks: thank you.

"Whatever the results, I'm proud of the campaign we fought together.

"And, with the polls now closed, I'd also like to say thank you to everyone who voted Conservative today. Your support is hugely appreciated."

Blob In Hartlepool, 49 candidates are standing for election to Hartlepool Borough Council.

One councillor will be elected to each of the 11 wards in Hartlepool and will serve for a term of four years. The 11 wards are Burn Valley, De Bruce, Fens and Rossmere, Foggy Furze, Hart, Headland and Harbour, Jesmond, Manor House, Rural West, Seaton and Victoria.

A third of the authority’s seats are up for grabs this year.

Comments (5)

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9:18am Fri 23 May 14

bambara says...

So we have a new 3rd Party in British politics:- The Tories
(Tongue in cheek on that one)
The LibDems have been given a very serious kicking, and may have returned to the ingominious position held by the Liberals pre-SDP.

Across Europe the political landscape is seeing a surge in support for extremist parties. (As indeed happened following the great depression) A general dissatisfaction with the establishment, dishonesty and corruption is triggering a backlash.

Sadly in too many places that backlash is providing succour to the extreme right wing, to racists and to those who push policies of hate and division.

With the threat of Europe tearing itself apart, and the USA bankrupting itself pusuing foreign wars, I look east to the two biggest countries in the world and see Communist China and Socialist India both growing and prospering.
The 19th Century was European, the 20th Century American, it appears the 21st century will belong to the East.
So we have a new 3rd Party in British politics:- The Tories (Tongue in cheek on that one) The LibDems have been given a very serious kicking, and may have returned to the ingominious position held by the Liberals pre-SDP. Across Europe the political landscape is seeing a surge in support for extremist parties. (As indeed happened following the great depression) A general dissatisfaction with the establishment, dishonesty and corruption is triggering a backlash. Sadly in too many places that backlash is providing succour to the extreme right wing, to racists and to those who push policies of hate and division. With the threat of Europe tearing itself apart, and the USA bankrupting itself pusuing foreign wars, I look east to the two biggest countries in the world and see Communist China and Socialist India both growing and prospering. The 19th Century was European, the 20th Century American, it appears the 21st century will belong to the East. bambara
  • Score: 1

10:21am Fri 23 May 14

behonest says...

Red Ed is dead.

A very disappointing night for Labour. They should have been looking to gain 400 to 500 seats to be favourites to win next year. Labour's Chuka Umunna suggested the ridiculously low total of 150 seats gained would be a decent result, and they haven't even achieved that yet - although many results are to come.

Whichever way you cut it though, Labour has not done well. UKIP has taken a lot of working class votes as well as from disaffected Tories.

It will be interesting to see the Euro results in a couple of days.

The good news for Britain is that this makes the nightmare scenario, of a Labour government next year, much more unlikely.
Red Ed is dead. A very disappointing night for Labour. They should have been looking to gain 400 to 500 seats to be favourites to win next year. Labour's Chuka Umunna suggested the ridiculously low total of 150 seats gained would be a decent result, and they haven't even achieved that yet - although many results are to come. Whichever way you cut it though, Labour has not done well. UKIP has taken a lot of working class votes as well as from disaffected Tories. It will be interesting to see the Euro results in a couple of days. The good news for Britain is that this makes the nightmare scenario, of a Labour government next year, much more unlikely. behonest
  • Score: 0

10:46am Fri 23 May 14

David Lacey says...

Well said behonest. The nightmare scenario of a majority Labour government is looking unlikely. I expect Sunday's European results to be UKIP's high point. Thereafter some disaffected Tories and Labour voters will return to the fold. In 2015 UKIP will do well to pick up a couple of seats in Westminster. However they will inevitably disrupt the results in many constituencies.
Well said behonest. The nightmare scenario of a majority Labour government is looking unlikely. I expect Sunday's European results to be UKIP's high point. Thereafter some disaffected Tories and Labour voters will return to the fold. In 2015 UKIP will do well to pick up a couple of seats in Westminster. However they will inevitably disrupt the results in many constituencies. David Lacey
  • Score: 0

11:11am Fri 23 May 14

Yemen says...

For anyone curious as to why UKIP has failed badly in London i offer up this quote.

"Suzanne Evans has uttered a sound bite UKIP would probably rather forget.Asked to explain the party's relatively poor performance in London on Radio 4, Evans said they had difficulty appealing to the "educated, cultured and young."

So there we have it ... must admit in not surprised by this in any way at all.
For anyone curious as to why UKIP has failed badly in London i offer up this quote. "Suzanne Evans has uttered a sound bite UKIP would probably rather forget.Asked to explain the party's relatively poor performance in London on Radio 4, Evans said they had difficulty appealing to the "educated, cultured and young." So there we have it ... must admit in not surprised by this in any way at all. Yemen
  • Score: 5

1:07pm Fri 23 May 14

John Durham says...

I can't believe the media are behaving as if these results were a surprise. Everyone has known for weeks what was going to happen and why.
The question now is what does this mean for 2015. Interesting that Labour did much better in areas in the South. Why, because the Euro -election and, because they were held on the same day, these local elections have become protest elections - so UKIP did well in areas where the establishment is Labour - meanwhile in the South East where Tories are the establishment then Labour can be seen as the protest vote.
This suggests to me that in 2015 when these protest UKIP voters drift back to vote for a government to run the country that Labour and the Tories will be neck and neck - with the most likely outcome still a non-majority Labour government.
Having said that it does show that the major parties need to do more to deal with the real or perceived impact of immigration on local communities.
I can't believe the media are behaving as if these results were a surprise. Everyone has known for weeks what was going to happen and why. The question now is what does this mean for 2015. Interesting that Labour did much better in areas in the South. Why, because the Euro -election and, because they were held on the same day, these local elections have become protest elections - so UKIP did well in areas where the establishment is Labour - meanwhile in the South East where Tories are the establishment then Labour can be seen as the protest vote. This suggests to me that in 2015 when these protest UKIP voters drift back to vote for a government to run the country that Labour and the Tories will be neck and neck - with the most likely outcome still a non-majority Labour government. Having said that it does show that the major parties need to do more to deal with the real or perceived impact of immigration on local communities. John Durham
  • Score: 3

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