Brassed ON - miners' band to the rescue after theatre show row

ON STAGE: Cast members of Brassed Off in York. The tour comes to Darlington next month and the show will go on, following the withdrawal of the brass band

ON STAGE: Cast members of Brassed Off in York. The tour comes to Darlington next month and the show will go on, following the withdrawal of the brass band

First published in News The Northern Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter (Darlington)

A REPLACEMENT has been found for a police band that quit a theatre show amid vociferous protests over their involvement.

Durham Miners' Association Band has agreed to take over from Durham Constabulary Brass Band in a production of Brassed Off, at Darlington Civic Theatre, next month.

The mining community, including Durham Miners Assocition itself, had objected to a band with police links taking part in the show, which tells the tale of a colliery band battling for its future amid pit closures and job losses.

Although the police band is made up of civilians, objectors felt its involvement was inappropriate given the resentment that still lingers over the role officers played in the 1984 Miners’ Strike.

Producer Jenny King, of the Touring Consortium Theatre Company, which is staging Brassed Off, acknowledged that it would have been much easier if the miners' association band had been booked in the first place, rather than the police band.

She said: “We take this show all over the country and everywhere we go, we need local bands, if possible with a connection to the mining industry.

“We have two or three people sourcing bands and we are incredibly grateful to Durham Miners' Association for coming to the rescue.

“The show will be all the better for it, their commitment will be fantastic.”

Meanwhile, The Northern Echo has learnt that Cockerton Band, in Darlington, was approached to take part more than a year ago.

Chairman John Steel said: “We said we would consider it, but [the producers] were not prepared to discuss a fee.

“We could not take on a job like that without some sort of retainer.”

Mr Steel said the band was not approached for a second time.

Ms King added that all brass bands used in the production are amateurs, as to pay professional rates would fall foul of the Musicians’ Union.

She confirmed that, although expenses are paid, the miners' association band will not receive a fee for its role in the production, nor would the police band had it taken part.

Brassed Off runs from March 18 to 22, to book visit darlingtoncivic.co.uk or call 01325-486555.

Comments (37)

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8:18am Sat 22 Feb 14

BMD says...

I hope the Civilian Police Band object and the people of Darlington boycott this production.

DMA - Disgrace
I hope the Civilian Police Band object and the people of Darlington boycott this production. DMA - Disgrace BMD
  • Score: 38

8:47am Sat 22 Feb 14

359282 says...

Well, I bet the rest of the country is suitably impressed with this example of good old North East warmth and charm- and we wonder why other regions sometimes see us as being backward.
Well, I bet the rest of the country is suitably impressed with this example of good old North East warmth and charm- and we wonder why other regions sometimes see us as being backward. 359282
  • Score: 22

8:54am Sat 22 Feb 14

colHarris says...

So let me get this right. Durham Miners Assoc complain about the police band doing this, police are then replaced by Durham Miners Band for this prestigious gig? Anyone else find this fishy?
So let me get this right. Durham Miners Assoc complain about the police band doing this, police are then replaced by Durham Miners Band for this prestigious gig? Anyone else find this fishy? colHarris
  • Score: 34

10:14am Sat 22 Feb 14

HH1954 says...

If Hopper and his acolytes turn in to DMA headquarters of a morning and find it ransacked and all the lodge banners missing are they going to call Durham Constabulary or Eddie Shoestring.?
Don't get me wrong, I'm of mining stock, the son of father who lost his life digging coal in the Durham Coalfields but it's time some of these dinosaurs at Miners Hall were as extinct as the fossils in the mines.
Embarrasing.
If Hopper and his acolytes turn in to DMA headquarters of a morning and find it ransacked and all the lodge banners missing are they going to call Durham Constabulary or Eddie Shoestring.? Don't get me wrong, I'm of mining stock, the son of father who lost his life digging coal in the Durham Coalfields but it's time some of these dinosaurs at Miners Hall were as extinct as the fossils in the mines. Embarrasing. HH1954
  • Score: 33

10:33am Sat 22 Feb 14

septicsid says...

Why didn't the Police band just change its name, lot of rehearsal will have taken place and three weeks isn't long enough to get a production ready. I know I played at Newcastle twenty years ago with a Championship section band. It's time politics were kept out of music.
Why didn't the Police band just change its name, lot of rehearsal will have taken place and three weeks isn't long enough to get a production ready. I know I played at Newcastle twenty years ago with a Championship section band. It's time politics were kept out of music. septicsid
  • Score: 18

11:01am Sat 22 Feb 14

charlie adam says...

the police band was under durham band which the producers agreed to so there would be no problems with it being a police band
the police band was under durham band which the producers agreed to so there would be no problems with it being a police band charlie adam
  • Score: 5

11:15am Sat 22 Feb 14

charlie adam says...

I think its disgraceful how the police band has been portrait through this. I would like people to know that the band is made of civillians who also play with colliery bands and take place in durham miners gala with pride every year in various colliery bands some even taking more than one band in and they do a lot of charity work that also includes old miners charities. They have been working on this everyday in their own time since last june and had perfected nearly every tune needed. This band needs praised up for what they do and not victimnized for what they are called
I think its disgraceful how the police band has been portrait through this. I would like people to know that the band is made of civillians who also play with colliery bands and take place in durham miners gala with pride every year in various colliery bands some even taking more than one band in and they do a lot of charity work that also includes old miners charities. They have been working on this everyday in their own time since last june and had perfected nearly every tune needed. This band needs praised up for what they do and not victimnized for what they are called charlie adam
  • Score: 33

11:22am Sat 22 Feb 14

David Lacey says...

Well said Charlie. It would have done no end of good if the two sides had agreed to portray the way we have emerged from the stone age and reconciled our differences. But we haven't - the ex miners have chips the size of pit props on their shoulders. We have settled our differences with Germany and Japan yet the miners seem incapable of moving on.
Well said Charlie. It would have done no end of good if the two sides had agreed to portray the way we have emerged from the stone age and reconciled our differences. But we haven't - the ex miners have chips the size of pit props on their shoulders. We have settled our differences with Germany and Japan yet the miners seem incapable of moving on. David Lacey
  • Score: 19

11:27am Sat 22 Feb 14

Edmondsley says...

The play is about a pit closure not the strike.When the stage show of Billy Elliot was produced in London the North East Police History Society were asked advice about uniforms etc of the time,That was about the pit strike..I spoke to police officers whose job it was to clean up bodies following the Easington disaster.Not a pleasant task.Perhaps this is more to do with DMA officials justifying their wages even though some are way past their retirement age.
The play is about a pit closure not the strike.When the stage show of Billy Elliot was produced in London the North East Police History Society were asked advice about uniforms etc of the time,That was about the pit strike..I spoke to police officers whose job it was to clean up bodies following the Easington disaster.Not a pleasant task.Perhaps this is more to do with DMA officials justifying their wages even though some are way past their retirement age. Edmondsley
  • Score: 19

1:16pm Sat 22 Feb 14

sineater says...

The miners union living in the past ,what about the investigation into Hillsborough,should that be dropped because it occured many years ago?, Some of the police at Hillsbourough were on duty during the miners strike,or is it an embarresment,Thatche
rs use of strong arm tactics ,used in dispute which was engineered to destroy the miners,in an act of revenge,it will never be forgotten,so deal with it.
The miners union living in the past ,what about the investigation into Hillsborough,should that be dropped because it occured many years ago?, Some of the police at Hillsbourough were on duty during the miners strike,or is it an embarresment,Thatche rs use of strong arm tactics ,used in dispute which was engineered to destroy the miners,in an act of revenge,it will never be forgotten,so deal with it. sineater
  • Score: -28

1:17pm Sat 22 Feb 14

darloboss says...

common sense to use a pit band for a play about a pit
and the chip on crazy laceys shoulder gets bigger and bigger and his rants just go on and on
common sense to use a pit band for a play about a pit and the chip on crazy laceys shoulder gets bigger and bigger and his rants just go on and on darloboss
  • Score: -14

1:24pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Haji el Maveric says...

Crazy Lacey is the biggest right wing troll on here.
Crazy Lacey is the biggest right wing troll on here. Haji el Maveric
  • Score: -17

1:29pm Sat 22 Feb 14

reasoned view says...

Seems the knuckle trailing heirarchy of the miners union cannot let go. They lost the pits, and now they think they have some say in who performs at this event. To see any NUM official present a case makes you realise imbeciles are still out there.
Seems the knuckle trailing heirarchy of the miners union cannot let go. They lost the pits, and now they think they have some say in who performs at this event. To see any NUM official present a case makes you realise imbeciles are still out there. reasoned view
  • Score: 18

1:40pm Sat 22 Feb 14

oliviaden6 says...

Rather sad a pathetic i feel, this is the 21st century not the dark ages of the 60's and 70's get a life folks and move on. It is this very sort of thing that holds back this country.
Rather sad a pathetic i feel, this is the 21st century not the dark ages of the 60's and 70's get a life folks and move on. It is this very sort of thing that holds back this country. oliviaden6
  • Score: 12

1:44pm Sat 22 Feb 14

darloboss says...

try the 80's
try the 80's darloboss
  • Score: -6

2:05pm Sat 22 Feb 14

rat man says...

septicsid wrote:
Why didn't the Police band just change its name, lot of rehearsal will have taken place and three weeks isn't long enough to get a production ready. I know I played at Newcastle twenty years ago with a Championship section band. It's time politics were kept out of music.
Yes, change the Bands name to the Ed Mili Band. Thats should keep the miners happy!
[quote][p][bold]septicsid[/bold] wrote: Why didn't the Police band just change its name, lot of rehearsal will have taken place and three weeks isn't long enough to get a production ready. I know I played at Newcastle twenty years ago with a Championship section band. It's time politics were kept out of music.[/p][/quote]Yes, change the Bands name to the Ed Mili Band. Thats should keep the miners happy! rat man
  • Score: 0

2:19pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Longbowman666 says...

Good to see the show will go on, but the situation shouldn't have arisen in the first place - the idiocy of continuing such childish views over this is oddly enough in direct contrast with those men who fought each other in the trenches, being shot at, mortared and the rest, and yet who can forgive each other for what they were doing.

They could do it...but these people can't?
Good to see the show will go on, but the situation shouldn't have arisen in the first place - the idiocy of continuing such childish views over this is oddly enough in direct contrast with those men who fought each other in the trenches, being shot at, mortared and the rest, and yet who can forgive each other for what they were doing. They could do it...but these people can't? Longbowman666
  • Score: 10

2:34pm Sat 22 Feb 14

latsot says...

The events of the strike should be remembered and we should learn from them. I can understand how frustrated people and whole communities feel about the closures, the strike and the police and government tactics used. They're bound to feel betrayed and ignored. Many people are sure to feel angry, bitter and resentful because of how they were treated. It's understandable that they don't want people to forget: many people are still living with the effects of the closures: there are whole towns in the area which have never recovered. The police were - with some reason - the main target for hostility. They were the most immediate opponents: people who were trying to stop others from protesting about something hugely important. It's not unreasonable that some of those involved feel poorly treated by the police and still resent the institution.

But I can't see how having a band with links to the police ousted after (presumably) putting in a lot of free time and effort in practice is anything other than petty.

Perhaps a better way to make noise would be to *welcome* the police band. To reach out to them, support them. Then the story could have been told from a sympathetic platform. The papers could be full of stories about how terrible things happened in the past and how we should remember and learn from them and how we should appreciate the impact it had on so many people's lives rather than stories of a few misguided and mean-spirited people who target their resentment at the wrong people out of what seems to be sheer bloody-mindedness.
The events of the strike should be remembered and we should learn from them. I can understand how frustrated people and whole communities feel about the closures, the strike and the police and government tactics used. They're bound to feel betrayed and ignored. Many people are sure to feel angry, bitter and resentful because of how they were treated. It's understandable that they don't want people to forget: many people are still living with the effects of the closures: there are whole towns in the area which have never recovered. The police were - with some reason - the main target for hostility. They were the most immediate opponents: people who were trying to stop others from protesting about something hugely important. It's not unreasonable that some of those involved feel poorly treated by the police and still resent the institution. But I can't see how having a band with links to the police ousted after (presumably) putting in a lot of free time and effort in practice is anything other than petty. Perhaps a better way to make noise would be to *welcome* the police band. To reach out to them, support them. Then the story could have been told from a sympathetic platform. The papers could be full of stories about how terrible things happened in the past and how we should remember and learn from them and how we should appreciate the impact it had on so many people's lives rather than stories of a few misguided and mean-spirited people who target their resentment at the wrong people out of what seems to be sheer bloody-mindedness. latsot
  • Score: 13

3:46pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Trommy says...

I am a member of the Durham Miners **** Band, I also help the Durham Police Band out on occasion, and numerous other bands. In 34 years of playing in bands, I can honestly say I have not met anyone I disliked. They are a group of people, with a gift, loyalty, and morals. There are also a lot of students that play for brass bands, big bands, orchestras. of which we have a few in Durham Miners band, and also, so does the police band. and all other bands specifically in our area,
Not long ago, Brass bands were becoming a dying institution, because of the colliery closures. Young people were moving away to make decent lives for themselves, and who can blame them! But, thank god for Universities, Durham, Sunderland, Newcastle, Teeside and Northumbria. There is an influx of young gifted people, who play in these musical set ups, and a very welcoming sight they are, For this reason, our musical Heritage will continue, So it would be awesome to see the so called adults to stop the bickering, wind yer necks in, and promote this amazing institution we have and not demote it. Thank you for taking the time to read this short article. Take Care all.
I am a member of the Durham Miners **** Band, I also help the Durham Police Band out on occasion, and numerous other bands. In 34 years of playing in bands, I can honestly say I have not met anyone I disliked. They are a group of people, with a gift, loyalty, and morals. There are also a lot of students that play for brass bands, big bands, orchestras. of which we have a few in Durham Miners band, and also, so does the police band. and all other bands specifically in our area, Not long ago, Brass bands were becoming a dying institution, because of the colliery closures. Young people were moving away to make decent lives for themselves, and who can blame them! But, thank god for Universities, Durham, Sunderland, Newcastle, Teeside and Northumbria. There is an influx of young gifted people, who play in these musical set ups, and a very welcoming sight they are, For this reason, our musical Heritage will continue, So it would be awesome to see the so called adults to stop the bickering, wind yer necks in, and promote this amazing institution we have and not demote it. Thank you for taking the time to read this short article. Take Care all. Trommy
  • Score: 27

4:20pm Sat 22 Feb 14

359282 says...

Is there room for a larger, combined ensemble of both bands ? That way we can salvage a little from this poor episode of entrenched bigotry
Is there room for a larger, combined ensemble of both bands ? That way we can salvage a little from this poor episode of entrenched bigotry 359282
  • Score: 8

4:52pm Sat 22 Feb 14

sineater says...

Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online .
Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online . sineater
  • Score: -8

4:55pm Sat 22 Feb 14

joedarlo45 says...

More than a little pathetic now from the Miners assoc....time to move on
More than a little pathetic now from the Miners assoc....time to move on joedarlo45
  • Score: 9

6:37pm Sat 22 Feb 14

MSG says...

Durham Miners Association are a load of backward looking Marxist scum !
Durham Miners Association are a load of backward looking Marxist scum ! MSG
  • Score: 2

7:22pm Sat 22 Feb 14

sineater says...

If you forget about history,you make the same mistakes again and again,unfortuantly some one did forget,thats why we have the shower of s**t that's in power now.trying to out do the monster Thatcher !!
If you forget about history,you make the same mistakes again and again,unfortuantly some one did forget,thats why we have the shower of s**t that's in power now.trying to out do the monster Thatcher !! sineater
  • Score: -17

7:40pm Sat 22 Feb 14

laboursfoe says...

sineater wrote:
If you forget about history,you make the same mistakes again and again,unfortuantly some one did forget,thats why we have the shower of s**t that's in power now.trying to out do the monster Thatcher !!
I completely agree with your first sentance, thats why Unions should be put firmly in their place and not be allowed to try and hold the country to ransom through illegal means ever again.
[quote][p][bold]sineater[/bold] wrote: If you forget about history,you make the same mistakes again and again,unfortuantly some one did forget,thats why we have the shower of s**t that's in power now.trying to out do the monster Thatcher !![/p][/quote]I completely agree with your first sentance, thats why Unions should be put firmly in their place and not be allowed to try and hold the country to ransom through illegal means ever again. laboursfoe
  • Score: 7

8:13pm Sat 22 Feb 14

sineater says...

They weren't using illegal means or do workers have to live without any rights at all ? They were striking because their wages were frozen ,and the cost of living was going up and up,so do people have no say in such things ? They were portayed in the right wing media ,as though they were trying to control the country ,they were not,they were fighting for their standard of living.
They weren't using illegal means or do workers have to live without any rights at all ? They were striking because their wages were frozen ,and the cost of living was going up and up,so do people have no say in such things ? They were portayed in the right wing media ,as though they were trying to control the country ,they were not,they were fighting for their standard of living. sineater
  • Score: -14

8:37pm Sat 22 Feb 14

bishopman says...

Shame, as has been mentioned, that the Durham Miners Association can't take up upon themselves to be reconciled withe the Police especially as when they would be the first to dial 999 and seek the support and help of the Police. There is no doubt that there was some despicable behaviour o n the picket line especially when they brought the Met Police 'up north'! I remember hearing the stories of intimidation from various police officers enjoying unlimited overtime but equally I remember the uncompromising and sometimes violent behaviour of the miners who were led into the situation by their Union leaders especially Arthur Scargill and his local cohorts who let the dispute continue long after they knew they would not defeat the Government of the day.
Shame, as has been mentioned, that the Durham Miners Association can't take up upon themselves to be reconciled withe the Police especially as when they would be the first to dial 999 and seek the support and help of the Police. There is no doubt that there was some despicable behaviour o n the picket line especially when they brought the Met Police 'up north'! I remember hearing the stories of intimidation from various police officers enjoying unlimited overtime but equally I remember the uncompromising and sometimes violent behaviour of the miners who were led into the situation by their Union leaders especially Arthur Scargill and his local cohorts who let the dispute continue long after they knew they would not defeat the Government of the day. bishopman
  • Score: 7

8:37pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Edmondsley says...

Sinneater you may be correct about the timing of the play,however the story has more to do with pit closures not the issues of police / pickets etc.
Sinneater you may be correct about the timing of the play,however the story has more to do with pit closures not the issues of police / pickets etc. Edmondsley
  • Score: 5

8:31am Sun 23 Feb 14

backworth2713 says...

Typical of the NUM. I am now a Police Officer and have been for 24yrs having left the mining industry in 1990, having worked there since 1980. Despite being loyal to the strike during 1984/85 when it came to the time for me to move on i asked the NUM to help me obtain my redundancy. However once they found out my new employment they point balnk refused to help me. So after ten years underground paying my NUM fees the one and only time i asked for their help they refused. Now 30yrs has almost passed since the strike, how many of the so called pickets are shaking? Why? Because it MAY be found that some of them were on the sick during the strike, obtaining sick money, whilst the real pickets got nothing. No strike pay, there was no strike fund. However I often saw NUM offcials with wads of money, handing it to some of the pickets. Having to wait for food parcels from Russia, yes Russia was embarrassing. However we did get a turkey and a bag of potatoes at Christmas 1984.
No doubt Messrs Hopper., Lavery and campbell will refute this. But the evidence will be there and you wont need to look very hard.
I am sure the people of the North will share my disgust at the attitude of the Durham Num. The strike is history and to be honest best forgotten.
Typical of the NUM. I am now a Police Officer and have been for 24yrs having left the mining industry in 1990, having worked there since 1980. Despite being loyal to the strike during 1984/85 when it came to the time for me to move on i asked the NUM to help me obtain my redundancy. However once they found out my new employment they point balnk refused to help me. So after ten years underground paying my NUM fees the one and only time i asked for their help they refused. Now 30yrs has almost passed since the strike, how many of the so called pickets are shaking? Why? Because it MAY be found that some of them were on the sick during the strike, obtaining sick money, whilst the real pickets got nothing. No strike pay, there was no strike fund. However I often saw NUM offcials with wads of money, handing it to some of the pickets. Having to wait for food parcels from Russia, yes Russia was embarrassing. However we did get a turkey and a bag of potatoes at Christmas 1984. No doubt Messrs Hopper., Lavery and campbell will refute this. But the evidence will be there and you wont need to look very hard. I am sure the people of the North will share my disgust at the attitude of the Durham Num. The strike is history and to be honest best forgotten. backworth2713
  • Score: 16

12:40pm Sun 23 Feb 14

sineater says...

Labour supporters will forget ,when tories stop harping on about things like the Iraq war,that is in the past ,best forgotten -yes----------- thought not !!!
Labour supporters will forget ,when tories stop harping on about things like the Iraq war,that is in the past ,best forgotten -yes----------- thought not !!! sineater
  • Score: -7

2:30pm Sun 23 Feb 14

backworth2713 says...

sineater wrote:
Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online .
The film is set in "Grimley" in the mid-1990s — a thinly disguised version of the real South Yorkshire village of Grimethorpe, which had been named as the poorest village in Britain two years earlier by the European Union. The nearby areas of the Dearne Valley and the Hemsworth area were also identified as in need of serious aid. Indeed, the soundtrack for the film was recorded by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, the story roughly reflects Grimethorpe Colliery Band's history, and the film was largely shot in Grimethorpe. The Grimley Colliery Band in the film is made up of a mixture of actors and members of the Grimethorpe Band.

The miners in the film put up little resistance to the coal board's harsh redundancy policy. This can be understood in the context of the 1984-85 British miners' strike, which effectively destroyed trade union power in British coal mining industry. The film depicts the spirit of hopelessness 10 years after the strike, and the miners' attempts to find redemption. An ongoing piece of symbolism in the first half of the film is the lack of conversation between one miner and his wife, until she finally criticises him harshly for not making a show of resistance against the closure, when he had been so full of fight in 1984
[quote][p][bold]sineater[/bold] wrote: Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online .[/p][/quote]The film is set in "Grimley" in the mid-1990s — a thinly disguised version of the real South Yorkshire village of Grimethorpe, which had been named as the poorest village in Britain two years earlier by the European Union. The nearby areas of the Dearne Valley and the Hemsworth area were also identified as in need of serious aid. Indeed, the soundtrack for the film was recorded by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, the story roughly reflects Grimethorpe Colliery Band's history, and the film was largely shot in Grimethorpe.[2] The Grimley Colliery Band in the film is made up of a mixture of actors and members of the Grimethorpe Band. The miners in the film put up little resistance to the coal board's harsh redundancy policy. This can be understood in the context of the 1984-85 British miners' strike, which effectively destroyed trade union power in British coal mining industry. The film depicts the spirit of hopelessness 10 years after the strike, and the miners' attempts to find redemption. An ongoing piece of symbolism in the first half of the film is the lack of conversation between one miner and his wife, until she finally criticises him harshly for not making a show of resistance against the closure, when he had been so full of fight in 1984 backworth2713
  • Score: 5

2:32pm Sun 23 Feb 14

backworth2713 says...

backworth2713 wrote:
sineater wrote: Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online .
The film is set in "Grimley" in the mid-1990s — a thinly disguised version of the real South Yorkshire village of Grimethorpe, which had been named as the poorest village in Britain two years earlier by the European Union. The nearby areas of the Dearne Valley and the Hemsworth area were also identified as in need of serious aid. Indeed, the soundtrack for the film was recorded by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, the story roughly reflects Grimethorpe Colliery Band's history, and the film was largely shot in Grimethorpe. The Grimley Colliery Band in the film is made up of a mixture of actors and members of the Grimethorpe Band. The miners in the film put up little resistance to the coal board's harsh redundancy policy. This can be understood in the context of the 1984-85 British miners' strike, which effectively destroyed trade union power in British coal mining industry. The film depicts the spirit of hopelessness 10 years after the strike, and the miners' attempts to find redemption. An ongoing piece of symbolism in the first half of the film is the lack of conversation between one miner and his wife, until she finally criticises him harshly for not making a show of resistance against the closure, when he had been so full of fight in 1984
Sineater please get your facts correct, or maybe leave it to people who went through the strike, and not those trying to gain political points
[quote][p][bold]backworth2713[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sineater[/bold] wrote: Sorry Edmonsley, the film is set at the time of the miners strike,look it up online .[/p][/quote]The film is set in "Grimley" in the mid-1990s — a thinly disguised version of the real South Yorkshire village of Grimethorpe, which had been named as the poorest village in Britain two years earlier by the European Union. The nearby areas of the Dearne Valley and the Hemsworth area were also identified as in need of serious aid. Indeed, the soundtrack for the film was recorded by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band, the story roughly reflects Grimethorpe Colliery Band's history, and the film was largely shot in Grimethorpe.[2] The Grimley Colliery Band in the film is made up of a mixture of actors and members of the Grimethorpe Band. The miners in the film put up little resistance to the coal board's harsh redundancy policy. This can be understood in the context of the 1984-85 British miners' strike, which effectively destroyed trade union power in British coal mining industry. The film depicts the spirit of hopelessness 10 years after the strike, and the miners' attempts to find redemption. An ongoing piece of symbolism in the first half of the film is the lack of conversation between one miner and his wife, until she finally criticises him harshly for not making a show of resistance against the closure, when he had been so full of fight in 1984[/p][/quote]Sineater please get your facts correct, or maybe leave it to people who went through the strike, and not those trying to gain political points backworth2713
  • Score: 2

2:40pm Sun 23 Feb 14

backworth2713 says...

David Lacey wrote:
Well said Charlie. It would have done no end of good if the two sides had agreed to portray the way we have emerged from the stone age and reconciled our differences. But we haven't - the ex miners have chips the size of pit props on their shoulders. We have settled our differences with Germany and Japan yet the miners seem incapable of moving on.
Mr Lacey dont tar all miners with the same brush. Read my comment and it will explain why, i am, and always will be, proud to be a part of mining history.
[quote][p][bold]David Lacey[/bold] wrote: Well said Charlie. It would have done no end of good if the two sides had agreed to portray the way we have emerged from the stone age and reconciled our differences. But we haven't - the ex miners have chips the size of pit props on their shoulders. We have settled our differences with Germany and Japan yet the miners seem incapable of moving on.[/p][/quote]Mr Lacey dont tar all miners with the same brush. Read my comment and it will explain why, i am, and always will be, proud to be a part of mining history. backworth2713
  • Score: 1

2:48pm Sun 23 Feb 14

backworth2713 says...

sineater wrote:
They weren't using illegal means or do workers have to live without any rights at all ? They were striking because their wages were frozen ,and the cost of living was going up and up,so do people have no say in such things ? They were portayed in the right wing media ,as though they were trying to control the country ,they were not,they were fighting for their standard of living.
yet again you are incorrect, the stike had nothing to do with wages, it was a campaign against pit closures.
[quote][p][bold]sineater[/bold] wrote: They weren't using illegal means or do workers have to live without any rights at all ? They were striking because their wages were frozen ,and the cost of living was going up and up,so do people have no say in such things ? They were portayed in the right wing media ,as though they were trying to control the country ,they were not,they were fighting for their standard of living.[/p][/quote]yet again you are incorrect, the stike had nothing to do with wages, it was a campaign against pit closures. backworth2713
  • Score: 6

5:46pm Sun 23 Feb 14

sineater says...

Once again I am correct about b oth,i was actually answering a comment about the strikes in '79 doh !!! But in '84 that was the aim aswell !! the same people who call people who are out of work lazy,are the same who refuse to recognise peoples right to strike to try and prevent job losses ,now you can't have it both ways,give your heads a shake and make your minds up .
Once again I am correct about b oth,i was actually answering a comment about the strikes in '79 doh !!! But in '84 that was the aim aswell !! the same people who call people who are out of work lazy,are the same who refuse to recognise peoples right to strike to try and prevent job losses ,now you can't have it both ways,give your heads a shake and make your minds up . sineater
  • Score: -11

10:22am Thu 27 Feb 14

359282 says...

Oh dear, the majority of these comments simply reinforce the impression that the North East is still living in the past.

Read the trail of these comments,then ask yourself a hypothetical question... ..... If you were looking to relocate a business, would you come to such a divided, backward looking area?
Oh dear, the majority of these comments simply reinforce the impression that the North East is still living in the past. Read the trail of these comments,then ask yourself a hypothetical question... ..... If you were looking to relocate a business, would you come to such a divided, backward looking area? 359282
  • Score: 1

2:12pm Thu 27 Feb 14

sineater says...

Backworth , If i'm wrong you better take it up with the people who made the film,because in the write up about the film that's what they say about the plot , that the events in the film were caused by the miners strike,and the eventual closure of the pit .
Backworth , If i'm wrong you better take it up with the people who made the film,because in the write up about the film that's what they say about the plot , that the events in the film were caused by the miners strike,and the eventual closure of the pit . sineater
  • Score: -1

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