North Yorkshire police officer given top award for tackling wildlife crime

The Northern Echo: PC Wilbor PC Wilbor

A NORTH Yorkshire police officer has been handed a top award for his efforts in tackling wildlife crime.

Richmondshire-based PC John Wilbor, described as a “god” when it comes to rural crime by a local gamekeeper, was presented with the World Wildlife Fund’s Wildlife Enforcer of the Year Award.

Said to be the ‘backbone’ of the Border Watch scheme, a rural watch for wildlife crime in the Richmondshire area, PC Wilbor has worked with the local community and Hambleton and Richmondshire Community Safety Partnership to tackle wildlife crime.

PC Wilbor said: “I am honoured and proud to have received the award for something which I feel very passionate about.
"Wildlife crime is an interesting and challenging area of work, particularly in the remote areas of North Yorkshire where I am based.

"It brings me great satisfaction to see people brought to justice for crimes against nature and our rural communities."

Heather Sohl, chief advisor on species at WWF-UK, added: “John’s community engagement work is truly impressive and I hope others are inspired to tackle wildlife crime in the same way. We need officers like John to galvanise community support in the fight against wildlife crime.”

Chief Superintendent Sue Day of North Yorkshire Police, added: “John is a well-respected and effective rural officer and a great role model for all rural crime officers. John is absolutely committed to supporting his Border Watch volunteer patrols.

“He regularly works into the early hours with them and has an excellent working relationship with the farming and game-keeping community in Richmondshire and the surrounding area.”

PC Wilbor has also provided guidance to forces setting up similar ‘watches’ in other areas.

WWF and the Partnership for Action against Wildlife Crime (PAW) presented the award at the 25th Annual UK National Wildlife Crime Conference.

Comments (4)

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8:15pm Mon 2 Dec 13

NO EINSTEIN says...

Absolutely unbelievable, you have officers solving rapes and murders, and they give a top award to a cop trying to track down Grey squirrels pretending to be red ones.

How about an award for the Community Support Officers for finding the most tea stops in one day, or how many times they can introduce them self as PC instead of CSO.
Absolutely unbelievable, you have officers solving rapes and murders, and they give a top award to a cop trying to track down Grey squirrels pretending to be red ones. How about an award for the Community Support Officers for finding the most tea stops in one day, or how many times they can introduce them self as PC instead of CSO. NO EINSTEIN

11:47am Tue 3 Dec 13

Colcat says...

So NO EINSTEIN is surprised when a wildlife charity gives an award for protection of wildlife to someone whose job (or part of it) is wildlife protection? Yep, living up to your name yet again.

I would like to congratulate PC John Wilbor for his efforts in this area which are extremely important, even if certain people who work(ed?) with animals and should know better can't see the importance of his work.
So NO EINSTEIN is surprised when a wildlife charity gives an award for protection of wildlife to someone whose job (or part of it) is wildlife protection? Yep, living up to your name yet again. I would like to congratulate PC John Wilbor for his efforts in this area which are extremely important, even if certain people who work(ed?) with animals and should know better can't see the importance of his work. Colcat

9:08pm Tue 3 Dec 13

NO EINSTEIN says...

Colcat wrote:
So NO EINSTEIN is surprised when a wildlife charity gives an award for protection of wildlife to someone whose job (or part of it) is wildlife protection? Yep, living up to your name yet again.

I would like to congratulate PC John Wilbor for his efforts in this area which are extremely important, even if certain people who work(ed?) with animals and should know better can't see the importance of his work.
Absolutely amazing, another Troll that thinks vermin should come before humans.
[quote][p][bold]Colcat[/bold] wrote: So NO EINSTEIN is surprised when a wildlife charity gives an award for protection of wildlife to someone whose job (or part of it) is wildlife protection? Yep, living up to your name yet again. I would like to congratulate PC John Wilbor for his efforts in this area which are extremely important, even if certain people who work(ed?) with animals and should know better can't see the importance of his work.[/p][/quote]Absolutely amazing, another Troll that thinks vermin should come before humans. NO EINSTEIN

1:31pm Thu 5 Dec 13

Colcat says...

It's absolutely disgusting that the police put any time whatsoever into thefts, robberies, muggings, animal crime, drugs, anti-social behaviour etc, when rapes and murders are happening. Every single crime other than rape or murder should be ignored and the full force of the law must immediately be redirected towards these two heinous crimes. That is essentially what you are saying, NO EINSTEIN. You are approaching this in the typical myopic, self important attitude of so many who have put the survival of the entire human race at peril. To state it in as simple a way as possible, wildlife survival = human survival. I really do believe this to be the case. Without a wide diversity of wildlife, the system will continue to collapse. Comments such as "a cop trying to track down Grey squirrels pretending to be red ones" are both vacuous and massively unhelpful.

Your comments, NO EINSTEIN, underline a belief I came to several years ago: generally (but definitely not always), farmers care as much for the environment in the same way that bankers care about the housing crisis. If there is no money in it for themselves, then they don't care a toss.

Am I saying that murder and rape are not important? Absolutely not, they are heinous crimes that need stopping, and the perpetrators locking up for the rest of their lives. But is it acceptable for someone to break the back leg of a kitten in four places, and allow it to re-set with it's knee and foot pointing backwards, before abandoning it so an animal charity had to send it for amputation, all before it is 6 weeks old, to let them get away without investigation and punishment? Absolutely not. (I bring this example up as it was in the Northern Echo on Monday 14th October 2013, she was called Wonky, and my wife and I adopted her. She is a lovely, lively 5 month old now called Willow, and how anyone can do this sort of thing sickens me. As do people who suggest these crimes are not important enough to be investigated.
It's absolutely disgusting that the police put any time whatsoever into thefts, robberies, muggings, animal crime, drugs, anti-social behaviour etc, when rapes and murders are happening. Every single crime other than rape or murder should be ignored and the full force of the law must immediately be redirected towards these two heinous crimes. That is essentially what you are saying, NO EINSTEIN. You are approaching this in the typical myopic, self important attitude of so many who have put the survival of the entire human race at peril. To state it in as simple a way as possible, wildlife survival = human survival. I really do believe this to be the case. Without a wide diversity of wildlife, the system will continue to collapse. Comments such as "a cop trying to track down Grey squirrels pretending to be red ones" are both vacuous and massively unhelpful. Your comments, NO EINSTEIN, underline a belief I came to several years ago: generally (but definitely not always), farmers care as much for the environment in the same way that bankers care about the housing crisis. If there is no money in it for themselves, then they don't care a toss. Am I saying that murder and rape are not important? Absolutely not, they are heinous crimes that need stopping, and the perpetrators locking up for the rest of their lives. But is it acceptable for someone to break the back leg of a kitten in four places, and allow it to re-set with it's knee and foot pointing backwards, before abandoning it so an animal charity had to send it for amputation, all before it is 6 weeks old, to let them get away without investigation and punishment? Absolutely not. (I bring this example up as it was in the Northern Echo on Monday 14th October 2013, she was called Wonky, and my wife and I adopted her. She is a lovely, lively 5 month old now called Willow, and how anyone can do this sort of thing sickens me. As do people who suggest these crimes are not important enough to be investigated. Colcat

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