Teacher strike hits 100 North Yorkshire schools

The Northern Echo: Teachers Paul Howe and Shaun Tomlinson on the picket line outside Thirsk School Teachers Paul Howe and Shaun Tomlinson on the picket line outside Thirsk School

MORE than 100 schools in the region are closed or operating with reduced staff today as teachers walk out in protest at industry changes.

Around 60 schools in North Yorkshire will shut for the day, while about 40 others will partially close.

The strike has been organised by the NASUWT and NUT which have accused Secretary of State Michael Gove of refusing to engage with unions about changes within education.

Celia Foote, NASUWT national executive member, said: “Gove’s education reforms are diametrically opposed to the best international practice and the professional and evidenced views of educational experts.

“In addition, the removal of the requirement for qualified teachers to be employed by schools can only further the negative impact his attacks are having in schools.”

A further day of action is planned in the North-East on October 17.

The Department for Education spokesman said it was disappointed that the unions were striking over the Government's measures to allow heads to pay good teachers more.

The schools in North Yorkshire due to close or partially close on Tuesday include:

Closed: Allertonshire School; Bedale High School; Croft Church of England Primary School; Easingwold School; Eskdale School; Glaisdale Primary School; Hambleton Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School; Leyburn Community Primary School; North and South Cowton Community Primary School; Richmond School; St Nicholas Church of England Primary School, West Tanfield; Stokesley Community Primary School.

Partially closed: Boroughbridge Primary School; Carlton and Faceby Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School; Carnagill Community Primary School, Catterick Garrison; Le Cateau Community Primary School, Catterick Garrison; Hambleton/Richmondshire Pupil Referral Service; Hawes Community Primary School; Hipswell Church of England Primary School; Hutton Rudby Primary School; Leeming and Londonderry Community Primary School; Malton School; Middleham Church of England Aided School; Risedale Community College; Sowerby Community Primary School; St Francis Xavier School; Stokesley School; Thirsk Community Primary School; Thirsk School & Sixth Form College.

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2:02pm Tue 1 Oct 13

thetruththewholetruthandnothingbutthetruth says...

This is typical of public sector workers. Always refusing to change/give better value for money/be more efficient. Etc etc etc.

They should be fined like parents are for taking their kids out of school. Disgraceful behaviour from this bunch of militants. What example are they setting for the kids!
This is typical of public sector workers. Always refusing to change/give better value for money/be more efficient. Etc etc etc. They should be fined like parents are for taking their kids out of school. Disgraceful behaviour from this bunch of militants. What example are they setting for the kids! thetruththewholetruthandnothingbutthetruth
  • Score: 0

6:38pm Tue 1 Oct 13

Voice-of-reality says...

Teachers seeing themselves as an industry is the first problem. They are not an industry - they are a profession. Accordingly, it is about time that they behaved as such. The excellence of non QTS staff is often found in the altogether better performing independent sector and should be welcomed into the state sector. The fear here is really that the ingrained dinosaur mentality may be missing from new recruits leading to 'fred who must sit in HIS chair in the staffroom next to the gas heater' being challenged. Third, paying good teachers more makes sense (so does sacking the mediocre ones).
Teachers seeing themselves as an industry is the first problem. They are not an industry - they are a profession. Accordingly, it is about time that they behaved as such. The excellence of non QTS staff is often found in the altogether better performing independent sector and should be welcomed into the state sector. The fear here is really that the ingrained dinosaur mentality may be missing from new recruits leading to 'fred who must sit in HIS chair in the staffroom next to the gas heater' being challenged. Third, paying good teachers more makes sense (so does sacking the mediocre ones). Voice-of-reality
  • Score: 1

8:30pm Tue 1 Oct 13

Sarah Tee says...

Voice-of-reality : why do the staff move from maintained sector into the independent sector? It's because they are treated better and valued more.

The issue isn't about paying good teachers more - it's about headteachers misusing their new freedom to reward favorites on the staff and to use it to bully staff. It's no wonder so many teachers are leaving the profession.
Voice-of-reality : why do the staff move from maintained sector into the independent sector? It's because they are treated better and valued more. The issue isn't about paying good teachers more - it's about headteachers misusing their new freedom to reward favorites on the staff and to use it to bully staff. It's no wonder so many teachers are leaving the profession. Sarah Tee
  • Score: 0

8:33pm Tue 1 Oct 13

Sarah Tee says...

@Thetruth - you'll find that they are. They lose a day's pay when they take a day's strike action.

Please, explain how teachers are refusing to give better value. They have been on a pay freeze for the last four years. This year they received a 1% pay award. Taking inflation into account they are earning 15% less than they earned four years ago. Accepting a pay freeze for four years - how is that not 'being more efficient' or 'giving better value'?
@Thetruth - you'll find that they are. They lose a day's pay when they take a day's strike action. Please, explain how teachers are refusing to give better value. They have been on a pay freeze for the last four years. This year they received a 1% pay award. Taking inflation into account they are earning 15% less than they earned four years ago. Accepting a pay freeze for four years - how is that not 'being more efficient' or 'giving better value'? Sarah Tee
  • Score: 0

9:51pm Tue 1 Oct 13

thetruththewholetruthandnothingbutthetruth says...

Sarah Tee wrote:
@Thetruth - you'll find that they are. They lose a day's pay when they take a day's strike action.

Please, explain how teachers are refusing to give better value. They have been on a pay freeze for the last four years. This year they received a 1% pay award. Taking inflation into account they are earning 15% less than they earned four years ago. Accepting a pay freeze for four years - how is that not 'being more efficient' or 'giving better value'?
My heart bleeds. Seriously, Join the club - you know the one - the one that all private sector workers are in.

Oh and your 3 and a half months a year off is the reason you'll never be efficient or indeed give good value.

Now please stop robbing our kids of a decent education, get back to bloody work, count yourself very lucky and stop thinking the world owes you a living.
[quote][p][bold]Sarah Tee[/bold] wrote: @Thetruth - you'll find that they are. They lose a day's pay when they take a day's strike action. Please, explain how teachers are refusing to give better value. They have been on a pay freeze for the last four years. This year they received a 1% pay award. Taking inflation into account they are earning 15% less than they earned four years ago. Accepting a pay freeze for four years - how is that not 'being more efficient' or 'giving better value'?[/p][/quote]My heart bleeds. Seriously, Join the club - you know the one - the one that all private sector workers are in. Oh and your 3 and a half months a year off is the reason you'll never be efficient or indeed give good value. Now please stop robbing our kids of a decent education, get back to bloody work, count yourself very lucky and stop thinking the world owes you a living. thetruththewholetruthandnothingbutthetruth
  • Score: 0

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