Richard III: Major blow for burial campaigners

The Northern Echo: York declines Richard III's remains York declines Richard III's remains

GROWING calls for Richard III to be re-interred in what some believe is his spiritual “home” have been served a crippling blow – with York Minster saying he should stay in Leicester.

Thousands of people have backed a campaign to see the long-dead monarch buried in the Minster following the discovery of his body under a Leicester car-park.

More than 11,000 signed an on-line petition calling for his reburial there instead of Leicester Cathedral and their calls were echoed by local tourism bosses, council chiefs and even an MP.

But York Minster – whose Dean, the Very Reverend Vivienne Faull, was until recently Dean of Leicester – has ended its silence on the matter and in a carefully-worded statement said the remains should stay in the Midlands.

“The Chapter of York understands the strong feeling of some people in York and Yorkshire that Richard III is significant to the history of the county and that therefore his body ought to be returned,” it said.

“However, the recent verification of the identity of his remains follows a significant period in which Leicester and Leicestershire gained a sense of Richard belonging there, at least in death.

“It was Leicester Franciscans who gave him burial, and the cathedral has a major memorial to his memory at its heart. When the possibility of an excavation of the Greyfriars site began, it was agreed from the start that any remains found would be reinterred in Leicester.”

It went on: “Since the news of the finding last year local people, like the people of York, have expressed a very strong wish that Richard, who has been with them since 1485, should stay in their keeping.

“The Chapter supports the terms of the Ministry of Justice licence and the wish of Chapter of Leicester that Richard should be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral.

“The Chapter of York commends Richard to Leicester's care and to the cathedral community's prayers.”

The Ministry of Justice, which licensed the exhumation, has also given Leicester’s case a boost by saying that, as the licence holder, a final decision was up to the city’s university.

However City of York Council leader responded: “Whilst we acknowledge the sensitivities and delicacy of this matter, we have a duty to reflect the voice of the people of York, King Richard III’s descendants and academic opinion.

“As a council we have sent written representation to the Crown and the Ministry of Justice and we await their response.

“Whatever the outcome we would want a lasting memorial to this last Yorkist monarch in his spiritual home.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:00pm Thu 7 Feb 13

ace38 says...

The Dean of York as a former Dean of Liecester is baised towards Liecester Cathedral. I want the people of York and the North East of England to back York Minster as Richard the Third`s final resting place. `The Nothern Echo` should back the campaign for York as well. "Richard the Third gained battle in vain" to quote the rainbow colour reminder, but may he rest in peace in York Minster!
The Dean of York as a former Dean of Liecester is baised towards Liecester Cathedral. I want the people of York and the North East of England to back York Minster as Richard the Third`s final resting place. `The Nothern Echo` should back the campaign for York as well. "Richard the Third gained battle in vain" to quote the rainbow colour reminder, but may he rest in peace in York Minster! ace38
  • Score: 0

7:18pm Thu 7 Feb 13

kernowoggie says...

I disagree with the last comment. I was in Leicester in 1985 and was a bell ringer at Leicester Cathedral at the time. There was a wonderful service in the Cathedral to commemorate the 500th anniversary of his death. I recall vividly a very large wreath of white roses (what else?) that was placed in the Cathedral chancel and was lit with spot lights. It was very moving and very respectful. There were also several special peals rung on the cities bells, including one at the Church of St Mary De Castro to commemorate the Quinn-Centenary of his death in 1985. What happened at York Minster in 1985? Absolutely nothing!! York want the bones because of the status symbol and to encourage tourism. Probably to inflate the entrance fee to get into the Minster. He was born in the midlands at Fotheringay Castle in Northamptonshire and was not born in Yorkshire. Whilst I am happy to acknowledge his links with Yorkshire (also through the Neville family who were close kin) I find some recent comments from Yorkshire too little & too late. Leicester have consistently supported Richard's cause over many years and long before his remains were ever found. York's case to become his final resting place is like a greedy relation eager to go through a decesed relatives belongings but coming no-where near them when living. Loyality is surely measured during the long dark years and isn't something that can be switched on and off to suit a goal or purpose. Dignity York please!

I know my views will upset some Yorkshire people but that's too bad. Leicester has earned the right to keep Richard III's remains. Oh, and yes, I have already rung in a quarter peal to mark the occasion of the rediscovery of Richard III''s remains. That was in Cornwall (on 4th Feb) where I now live. Despite perusal of the campanophile site, it seems the bells of Yorkshire remain silent.
I disagree with the last comment. I was in Leicester in 1985 and was a bell ringer at Leicester Cathedral at the time. There was a wonderful service in the Cathedral to commemorate the 500th anniversary of his death. I recall vividly a very large wreath of white roses (what else?) that was placed in the Cathedral chancel and was lit with spot lights. It was very moving and very respectful. There were also several special peals rung on the cities bells, including one at the Church of St Mary De Castro to commemorate the Quinn-Centenary of his death in 1985. What happened at York Minster in 1985? Absolutely nothing!! York want the bones because of the status symbol and to encourage tourism. Probably to inflate the entrance fee to get into the Minster. He was born in the midlands at Fotheringay Castle in Northamptonshire and was not born in Yorkshire. Whilst I am happy to acknowledge his links with Yorkshire (also through the Neville family who were close kin) I find some recent comments from Yorkshire too little & too late. Leicester have consistently supported Richard's cause over many years and long before his remains were ever found. York's case to become his final resting place is like a greedy relation eager to go through a decesed relatives belongings but coming no-where near them when living. Loyality is surely measured during the long dark years and isn't something that can be switched on and off to suit a goal or purpose. Dignity York please! I know my views will upset some Yorkshire people but that's too bad. Leicester has earned the right to keep Richard III's remains. Oh, and yes, I have already rung in a quarter peal to mark the occasion of the rediscovery of Richard III''s remains. That was in Cornwall (on 4th Feb) where I now live. Despite perusal of the campanophile site, it seems the bells of Yorkshire remain silent. kernowoggie
  • Score: 2

9:58pm Thu 7 Feb 13

Voice-of-reality says...

Would not St Margaret's Leicester be more fitting as more of the church dates from the period.
Would not St Margaret's Leicester be more fitting as more of the church dates from the period. Voice-of-reality
  • Score: 0

8:00am Fri 8 Feb 13

roseofyork says...

Richard 111 must go to York where he wished to lie.
He spent most of his short life in Yorkshire and was a much loved Lord of the North.
York defied the new king by expressing their grief at Richard's death
The only connection Richard has with Leicester is it was the place where he was hacked to death and murdered defending his country from a band of merecnaries funded by French gold, was vilely betrayed and then had the populace defile his body.
Would you want to be buried in such a situation.
Should we have buried Princess Diana in Paris because she died there?
The law pertaining to archaeological bodies was never meant for a tragic king of England.
He belongs to us all not a City Council who have admitted to wanting him for tourist purposes.
We all need to stop betraying this poor man as happened in 1485.
Please help get him back to York.
There are three petitions
www.bringbackrichard
.co.uk
http://epetitions.di
rect.gov.uk/petition
s/38772
http://www.thepetiti
onsite.com/961/861/6
72/return-king-richa
rd-iii-to-yorkshire/
#sign
Please support this.
Richard 111 must go to York where he wished to lie. He spent most of his short life in Yorkshire and was a much loved Lord of the North. York defied the new king by expressing their grief at Richard's death The only connection Richard has with Leicester is it was the place where he was hacked to death and murdered defending his country from a band of merecnaries funded by French gold, was vilely betrayed and then had the populace defile his body. Would you want to be buried in such a situation. Should we have buried Princess Diana in Paris because she died there? The law pertaining to archaeological bodies was never meant for a tragic king of England. He belongs to us all not a City Council who have admitted to wanting him for tourist purposes. We all need to stop betraying this poor man as happened in 1485. Please help get him back to York. There are three petitions www.bringbackrichard .co.uk http://epetitions.di rect.gov.uk/petition s/38772 http://www.thepetiti onsite.com/961/861/6 72/return-king-richa rd-iii-to-yorkshire/ #sign Please support this. roseofyork
  • Score: 1

6:33pm Mon 11 Feb 13

kernowoggie says...

It looks like common sense will prevail and his bones will be interred in Leicester. This is similar to what happened when the wife of Captain Scott (of Antartic fame) crafted a sculpture of Captian Smith of the ill fated Titanic. She offered the finished work to both Southampton and Belfast and they both turned it down. However, AFTER the wreck of the Titanic was discovered in more recent times and interest in the whole matter revived with the centenary of the disaster, so did interest in Captain Smith's statue. It was erected in Lichfield in Staffordshire in the part of the country where he was born. Then in recent times Southampton (rather cheekily) demanded its statue back. In fact it was never theirs in the first place! Similarly, Richard's bones should remain in the midlands, where he was born and where his memory has been honoured consistently over many years and not due any desired status or financial profit.
It looks like common sense will prevail and his bones will be interred in Leicester. This is similar to what happened when the wife of Captain Scott (of Antartic fame) crafted a sculpture of Captian Smith of the ill fated Titanic. She offered the finished work to both Southampton and Belfast and they both turned it down. However, AFTER the wreck of the Titanic was discovered in more recent times and interest in the whole matter revived with the centenary of the disaster, so did interest in Captain Smith's statue. It was erected in Lichfield in Staffordshire in the part of the country where he was born. Then in recent times Southampton (rather cheekily) demanded its statue back. In fact it was never theirs in the first place! Similarly, Richard's bones should remain in the midlands, where he was born and where his memory has been honoured consistently over many years and not due any desired status or financial profit. kernowoggie
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree