THIS week we've raided The Northern Echo's photo archive for a look back through time at Durham City.

We've found a packet marked "C", so it is supposed to feature photographs of items that begin with a C – castles, churches, cathedrals, courts.

This, therefore, means that practically any picture of Durham that a librarian didn't know what to do with got jammed in this packet – although we cannot work out why the petition against nuclear weapons was included. Perhaps it was a campaign.

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The Northern Echo: CASTLE CHARE: Now known as St Anne's Court, this mid 18th Century townhouse was for many decades a hotel called The Wheatsheaf although it became the presbytery for St Godric's when the church was built in 1864. This picture was taken in March 198

Now known as St Anne's Court, this mid 18th Century townhouse was for many decades a hotel called The Wheatsheaf although it became the presbytery for St Godric's when the church was built in 1864. This picture was taken in March 1980 when it had survived the riverside slum clearance programme and had been converted into an arts centre. It is now private appartments, and Memories 214 was privileged to feature a nosey round the hotel's concert room which is covered in 1750s plasterwork and has a magnificent view to the cathedral – quite probably the finest room in Durham

The Northern Echo: GREAT FASCINATION: A large queue forms outside Durham Crown Court on September 11, 1984, to see triple murderer Arthur Hutchinson sentenced. Hutchinson, who was born in Hartlepool, had killed three members of the Laitner family near Sheffield, and raped a

A large queue forms outside Durham Crown Court on September 11, 1984, to see triple murderer Arthur Hutchinson sentenced. Hutchinson, who was born in Hartlepool, had killed three members of the Laitner family near Sheffield, and raped another, following a wedding reception. At the time he'd been on the run having being convicted of attempting to murder his brother-in-law but had escaped from police through a toilet window. Home Secretary Leon Brittan placed a "whole life" tariff on him, which has been the subject of several appeals to the European Court of Human Rights, the most recent of which in January was lost

If any of these pictures trigger any thoughts, information, or memories, we'd love to hear from you. Please email chris.lloyd@nne.co.uk