Building bosses warn Government over apprenticeships

BUILDING WARNING: The Federation of Master Builders says Government funding reforms could stop companies taking on younger workers

BUILDING WARNING: The Federation of Master Builders says Government funding reforms could stop companies taking on younger workers

First published in Business News

BUILDING bosses have warned the Government must do more to address a skills shortage and get more apprentices into the trade.

A survey from the Federation of Master Builders (FMB) says Government funding reforms could stop companies taking on younger workers.

Brian Berry, FMB chief executive, said: “More than a third of construction small and medium-sized businesses tell us that they are struggling to recruit the bricklayers they need to stay on top of their workloads.

“Plasterers are almost as difficult to come by with 27 per cent of firms saying they are having difficulty finding these skilled tradesmen.

“The results act as a stark warning that the Government must not take the recovery in the construction sector for granted.

“Firms are still hugely concerned about the impact of the Government’s apprenticeship funding reforms.

“If they are implemented as proposed, most micro-businesses, which currently train two-thirds of all construction apprentices, are likely to stop hiring apprentices altogether.

“The Construction Training Industry Board has forecast 182,000 new UK jobs are expected to be created in the construction industry by 2018, so this is not the time to jeopardise the ability of small firms to continue their proud history of training apprentices.

“Not only would this be disastrous for the construction, it would be disastrous for the wider economy which is largely relying on construction and housing to drive the recovery.”

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:25am Mon 28 Jul 14

echomike says...

By the age of 15 my generation had been taught the basics of woodwork, metalwork and brickwork as well as maths,physics english etc. In fact the practical skills helped to explain the need for the academic subjects.
I went on to university and became a Chartered Enginner but those practical skills have always been important.
What happened to our schools and that education, most school leavers do not seem to be at the starting point for an apprenticeships.
By the age of 15 my generation had been taught the basics of woodwork, metalwork and brickwork as well as maths,physics english etc. In fact the practical skills helped to explain the need for the academic subjects. I went on to university and became a Chartered Enginner but those practical skills have always been important. What happened to our schools and that education, most school leavers do not seem to be at the starting point for an apprenticeships. echomike
  • Score: 0

8:31pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Border Terrier says...

echomike wrote:
By the age of 15 my generation had been taught the basics of woodwork, metalwork and brickwork as well as maths,physics english etc. In fact the practical skills helped to explain the need for the academic subjects.
I went on to university and became a Chartered Enginner but those practical skills have always been important.
What happened to our schools and that education, most school leavers do not seem to be at the starting point for an apprenticeships.
"Strange" But true.
[quote][p][bold]echomike[/bold] wrote: By the age of 15 my generation had been taught the basics of woodwork, metalwork and brickwork as well as maths,physics english etc. In fact the practical skills helped to explain the need for the academic subjects. I went on to university and became a Chartered Enginner but those practical skills have always been important. What happened to our schools and that education, most school leavers do not seem to be at the starting point for an apprenticeships.[/p][/quote]"Strange" But true. Border Terrier
  • Score: 0

3:59pm Wed 30 Jul 14

RealLivin says...

To many ologies, not enough working trades, every civilizations needs builders, cooks and transport, driverless transport is on its way but transport management is a skilled job at least to do it properly. We can all bung our ready meals in the micro wave, but its much more efficient to have a cook and keep the guys working, and while engineers are not classed as unskilled many professionals ie bankers, lawyers and that type look on brickies, plumbers and sparkies as none skilled, just because theres no GCSE, A level or degree involved doesnt mean its unskilled. At school my year was one of the last where boys did metal work, wood work and Tech drawing, the next years were having boys doing cooking, no problems there but as girls didnt want to do the boys courses in a few years all the technical courses were gone. If you cant build your house, cook your dinner or get your goods delivered then these no civilisation.
To many ologies, not enough working trades, every civilizations needs builders, cooks and transport, driverless transport is on its way but transport management is a skilled job at least to do it properly. We can all bung our ready meals in the micro wave, but its much more efficient to have a cook and keep the guys working, and while engineers are not classed as unskilled many professionals ie bankers, lawyers and that type look on brickies, plumbers and sparkies as none skilled, just because theres no GCSE, A level or degree involved doesnt mean its unskilled. At school my year was one of the last where boys did metal work, wood work and Tech drawing, the next years were having boys doing cooking, no problems there but as girls didnt want to do the boys courses in a few years all the technical courses were gone. If you cant build your house, cook your dinner or get your goods delivered then these no civilisation. RealLivin
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree